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The Southern Arkansas University Research Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey (AAS-SAU) is located on the SAU campus in Magnolia, Arkansas. The AAS-SAU Research Station is responsible for the archeological resources of 11 counties in southwestern Arkansas. The station territory stretches from the southern edge of the Ouachita Mountains to the Arkansas/Louisiana state Line, and incorporates the Great Bend region of the Red River. The late prehistoric and protohistoric inhabitants within the station territory were members of the Caddoan culture (in the west) and the Plaquemine culture (in the east). Among the important sites in the SAU station territory is Crenshaw, the earliest known Caddoan ceremonial center, and Historic Washington State Park, an antebellum town restored and interpreted by Arkansas State Parks and the Pioneer Washington Restoration Foundation.

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AAS-SAU News

Kadohadacho News for October 2014

Hi Folks! The Kadohadacho News for October is out, though a few days late (sorry). Give it a look, and I hope to see you all on Tuesday night as we hear from Dr. Emily Beahm on the Castalian Springs site in Tennessee. Kadohadacho News 2014_10

Manuscript Monday: Jeter et al’s Overview of the LMV

Today’s Manuscript Monday is an important overview of Arkansas (and Louisiana) archaeology. Well, the southern portion of Arkansas, at least. Jeter et al’s (1989) Archeology and Bioarcheology of the Lower Mississippi Valley and Trans-Mississippi South in Arkansas and Louisiana. I’ve been using this a lot in working on the final report of last February’s fieldwork… Read More

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Manuscript Monday: Whittaker’s “Flintknapping”

For this week’s Manuscript Monday, I’m going back to my roots. I earned my undergraduate degree at Grinnell College, a tiny but rigorous liberal arts college adrift in a sea of Iowa corn. It was a wonderful place to learn, and I met my wife there, so… double-win! My instruction at Grinnell was primarily under… Read More

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Manuscript Monday: La Vere’s “The Caddo Chiefdoms”

Today, we’re looking at David La Vere’s The Caddo Chiefdoms: Caddo Economics and Politics, 700-1835 (University of Nebraska Press, 1998). This book covers a little over a millennium of Caddo history, from what archaeologists believe is the formation of the group around 800 AD up until the breakup of Caddo communities and dislocation of Caddo… Read More