Southern Arkansas University – Faculty Handbook

Table of Contents

Faculty Handbook

13th Edition

Edited by the
Faculty Senate Handbook Committee

Shannin Schroeder, Chair
Alice Fanning
Jennifer Logan
Connie Wilson

Additional Assistance from
Roger Giles, Vice President for Administration and General Counsel

Recommended by the Faculty Senate
and Adopted by the Faculty Assembly

April 29, 2020

Approved by the Board of Trustees

June 18, 2020

About This Document

The Faculty Senate may make mechanical, grammatical, format, and consistency corrections to the SAU Faculty Handbook with simple approval by the Senate, rather than presenting those corrections to the General Faculty. Substantive changes to the Faculty Handbook are subject to approval by the Faculty Assembly and by the Board of Trustees, with the exception of amendments to Chapters V (Standing Committees), VI (Academic Policies), and X (Search Policy for Faculty and Administration), which are final with the approval of the University President. Electronic versions of all forms are preferable and will be available via hyperlink within the Handbook. Whenever hyperlinks are unavailable, materials shall appear in an appendix. Forms are not considered part of the Handbook itself and may be updated with the approval of the President.

General Information about Southern Arkansas University

Southern Arkansas University (SAU) is a two-campus system comprised of a regional state university and a technical college with both state and regional responsibilities. Recognizing the diversity of student backgrounds and educational experiences, each campus accepts its coordinated and unique role.

  1. Mission Statement

    1. The mission of Southern Arkansas University is to educate students for productive and fulfilling lives in a global environment by providing opportunities for intellectual growth, individual enrichment, skill development, and meaningful career preparation. The University believes in the worth of the individual and accepts its responsibility for developing in its students those values and competencies essential for effective citizenship in an ever-changing, free, and democratic society. Further, the University provides an environment conducive to excellence in teaching and learning, scholarship, creative endeavors, and service.
  2. Role and Scope of Southern Arkansas University (Approved by the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board, July 25, 2008)

    1. Audiences – SAU s responsible for serving
      1. residents of southwest and south-central Arkansas who have completed a high school education and are either seeking a college degree or continuing professional education and residents of the state through specific degree programs and services;
      2. employers in the region, both public and private: school districts, health care providers, local governments, and private businesses;
      3. economic development interests and entrepreneurs in the region;
      4. the community and area by providing a broad range of academic and cultural activities and public events;
      5. area K-12 schools seeking college general education courses for advanced students; and
      6. two-year college transfer students.
    1. Array of Programs and Services – SAU serves its primary audiences by providing
      1. an associate- and baccalaureate-level program in nursing;
      2. baccalaureate programs in arts and humanities, the natural sciences, and social sciences appropriate to a teaching institution with a predominantly undergraduate student body;
      3. baccalaureate programs in the professional fields of business, education, nursing, and human services (i.e., social work and criminal justice);
      4. master’s programs in education, computer science, kinesiology, counseling, public administration, business administration, and agriculture;
      5. a doctoral program in rural and diverse educational leadership; and
      6. services specifically designed to meet the needs of regional economic development (small business development, support for entrepreneurs, problem-solving).
    2. Special Features
      1. Agriculture and education programs
      2. Natural Resources Research Center (NRRC) with emphasis in soil and water quality for the public, municipalities, and local industries
      3. Nursing programs to assist regional medical community needs
      4. Innovative Gaming and Animation Design programs with art and computer science tracks
      5. Engineering program unique to the region
      6. Cyber Security major first of its kind in the region
  1. University Learning Goals

To accomplish the University’s mission to educate students, the general education curriculum and all program curricula provide learning opportunities that assist students in attaining the following University Learning Goals and Objectives:

    1. Effective Communication

Our graduates can communicate effectively. Effective communication embraces oral, visual, and language arts, including the ability to listen, speak, read, and write. It includes the effective use of various resources and technology for personal and professional communication.

      • Our students can write effectively.
      • Our students can effectively deliver an oral presentation.
    1. Personal and Social Responsibility

Our graduates are prepared to be personally and socially responsible citizens, having the ability to apply knowledge and skills that encourage responsible civic engagement for the advancement of society. This includes an understanding of their own and other cultures and societies and the ability to make informed and ethical decisions.

      • Our students demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of their own and other societies and cultures.
      • Our students demonstrate an understanding of the process of making informed and ethical decisions.
      • Our students demonstrate an understanding of facts within historical and cultural contexts.
  1. Critical Thinking

Our graduates can think critically, solve problems, and make informed decisions. Critical thinking is the ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information and ideas from multiple perspectives. It includes the accurate use of terminology, information literacy, the application of scholarly and scientific methods, logical argument, and the capability for analysis and problem solving.

      • Our students use appropriate quantitative skills in making decisions.
      • Our students demonstrate an ability to think critically and creatively to analyze and solve problems.
  1. Information Literacy

Our graduates can use technology effectively in their fields. Information literacy is the ability to determine the nature of required information, to access it effectively and efficiently, and to evaluate it critically. It includes the responsible, legal, and ethical use of information.

  1. Content Knowledge

Our graduates have content knowledge in their chosen fields and the necessary skills to be successful. Content knowledge is discipline and degree specific.

As one means of attaining the mission of the University and of providing the student with a basic well-rounded education, all candidates for degrees complete prescribed general education courses. The general education curriculum includes courses that introduce and reinforce learning objectives for the following goals: Effective Communication, Personal and Social Responsibility, and Critical Thinking.

To accomplish the University’s mission to educate students, all candidates for degrees complete the prescribed major and minor requirements of the University’s degree programs. Curricula in all programs reinforce the learning objectives for effective communication, personal and social responsibility, and critical thinking; curricula in all programs also introduce and reinforce learning objectives for the following goals: Information Literacy and Content Knowledge.

The University measures student learning related to all five University Learning Goals and uses this information to continuously improve the curricula. Assessment reports that describe the ways these goals are integrated into classes are available through the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and are reported within the University’s accreditation documents.

  1. Accreditation

Southern Arkansas University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, as well as the

    • Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET),
    • Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. (ACEN),
    • Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International),
    • Commissions on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education,
    • The Council for the Accreditation of Education Preparation (CAEP),
    • Council on Social Work Education,
    • National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP), and
    • National Committee for Accreditation of Coaching Education (NCACE).
  1. Memberships

Southern Arkansas University holds memberships in the following national organizations:

    • Accreditation of Teacher Education
    • American Association for Higher Education and Accreditation
    • American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
    • American Association of University Women
    • The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International
    • Conference of Southern Graduate Schools
    • Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation
    • The Higher Learning Commission
    • National Association of Schools of Music
    • National Collegiate Athletic Association
    • National Collegiate Honors Council
    • National Commission on Accrediting
    • National Council of Educational Opportunity Associations
    • National League for Nursing
    • United States Center for Coaching Excellence
  1. A Brief History of the University

Southern Arkansas University was founded more than a century ago as the Third District Agricultural School (TDAS) by Act 100 of the Arkansas legislature on April 1, 1909. SAU celebrates this date as Founder’s Day. The school was a Progressive Era educational reform urged by the Farmers Educational and Cooperative Union. It taught rural young men and women scientific agricultural practices and modern home economics and awarded high school degrees. The Farmers Union’s legacy endured at SAU. The University operates one of the state’s largest collegiate farms, and the school’s colors – Blue and Gold – are those of the union. SAU’s agricultural roots are also evident in its unique symbol – the Mulerider – adopted in 1912 when its football players rode mules to practice and games.

To increase the supply of rural schoolteachers, Arkansas elevated TDAS and the state’s three other residential agricultural schools to junior college status with Special Act 229 in 1923 and Act 45 in 1925. Officially renamed State Agricultural and Mechanical College, Third District, the school was known everywhere as Magnolia A&M College. The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools accredited Magnolia A&M in 1929. The institution afterward has maintained continuous accreditation.

In the fall of 1949 the Board of Trustees, exercising authority vested in it by the state legislature, decided to change the junior college into a four-year, degree-granting institution. By Act 11 on January 24, 1951, the legislature confirmed this change with a new name, Southern State College (SSC). Enrollment grew from a few hundred students during the junior college years to well over two thousand during SSC’s twenty-five-year history. The Arkansas legislature, with Act 171 on February 14, 1975, created a three-campus SSC system by adding two junior college branches at El Dorado and Camden to the main campus at Magnolia. The El Dorado branch, however, became independent in 1991. Having gained approval in 1973 from North Central Association to offer graduate courses in education, SSC began offering master’s degrees on June 2, 1975.

In April 2019, the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board authorized Southern Arkansas University to offer its first doctoral degree in the area of Rural and Diverse Educational Leadership.

Organization within the University

  1. Board of Trustees

Government of the University is vested in the Board of Trustees, consisting of five members who are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate of Arkansas. Each board member serves a five-year term. Terms of appointment are staggered so that one member is appointed each year. The Board determines the general policies of the University and approves expenditures of its funds.

  1. Administrative Officers

The Organizational Chart illustrates the structure of the University’s internal administrative organization and its relationship to the Board of Trustees.

  1. Academic Organization

An Academic Organization Chart illustrates the structure of the academic programs of Southern Arkansas University, which are administered by the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs (Provost). The University is organized into four colleges (the David F. Rankin College of Business, the College of Education, the College of Liberal and Performing Arts, and the College of Science and Engineering) and the School of Graduate Studies. The Library Director, the Registrar, the Director of Continuing Education, and the Director of the Honors College all report directly to the Provost.

  1.  Continuous Quality Improvement

SAU has a commitment to continuous quality improvement is the subject of Section VI of this document. The Open Pathway model of accreditation is a quality-based, continuous improvement mode of accreditation promoted by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC).

  1. Faculty Governance

The Faculty Assembly and the Faculty Senate are the subjects of Sections III and IV of this document, and their roles in the overall functioning of Southern Arkansas University are described there.

  1. Communication

The channels of communication are a two-way process. One way involves communication from administrative officers to faculty. The other involves communication from the faculty to the administration. Thus, channels of communication operate throughout the University by means of individual discussion, written communication, and committee reports. Any faculty members should feel free to discuss any program or problems related to the University with the administrative staff members concerned with the program or problems. However, faculty members are encouraged to indicate this intention to their immediate supervisor.

Communication among the various constituent groups of the University is achieved through a variety of means, including

    • electronic mail messages sent to individuals or groups,
    • campus mail, with slots for each department and office within the University,
    • regular and called meetings of departments, colleges, the Faculty Senate, and the Faculty Assembly,
    • minutes of meetings of the Faculty Assembly, the Faculty Senate, and certain ad hoc committees, which are distributed to the faculty,
    • other written communications and discussions, and
    • The Stater, a semi-annual publication for alumni and friends of SAU.

Faculty Assembly

The administrative and instructional staffs compose the faculty of Southern Arkansas University and operate under a Faculty Constitution. One of the purposes of this organization is to maintain democratic processes. Much of the work of the faculty is done through the Standing Committees of the University or ad hoc committees. See Section V for Standing Committees of the University.

The Provost, in consultation with the President of the University, prepares an agenda for the Assembly meetings and sends a copy of the agenda and the time of the meeting to each faculty member. Items to be considered for the agenda may be submitted by the Faculty Senate, other Standing Committees of the University, or any faculty member. The President of the University is President of the Assembly and presides at its meetings. In the absence of the President, the Provost presides. The Faculty Assembly expects each member of the Assembly to attend meetings.

The Faculty Assembly Constitution

Preamble

Efficient operation and democratic process are two ideals for which most American institutions strive, and while the unfaltering quest for either may impair the attainment of the other, history shows that if either is totally absent, the other will not long endure. It is the purpose of the Constitution to provide a framework that will contribute to the optimum realization of both of these ideals at Southern Arkansas University.

Definition of Terms: For the purpose of the Faculty Assembly, the administrative staff shall comprise the Provost, student affairs, administration, finance, facilities, the college deans, and the dean of the school of graduate studies.

The instructional staff shall comprise all full-time staff members whose primary duty is instruction.

The operational staff shall comprise all full-time employees of the University not included above.

Article I

The name of the organization shall be the Faculty Assembly of Southern Arkansas University.

Article II

Section 1. Members of this organization (hereinafter called the Assembly) shall be members of the administrative staff and instructional staff.

Section 2. The administrative staff shall be responsible to the President of the University for the establishment of channels of communication and proper practices for effective administration.

Section 3. The instructional staff shall be responsible to the Provost for the departmental organization and functions contributing to the effective accomplishment of the academic purposes of the University.

Article III

Section 1. The purpose of the organization shall be to provide an Assembly of the entire University faculty.

Section 2. The Assembly, by majority vote, may send any recommendations of the Faculty Senate back to that body for review.

Article IV

Section 1. The officers of the organization shall be the president, the vice president, the secretary, and the parliamentarian.

Section 2. The President of the University shall be the President of the Assembly and preside at the meetings whenever possible. The Provost shall be the Vice President of the assembly and shall preside in the absence of the President. It shall be the duty of these officers to prepare an agenda and notify each member of the forthcoming meeting.

Section 3. The secretary shall be elected by the Assembly from its membership and shall record the proceedings of each meeting and publish the minutes.

Section 4. The parliamentarian shall be elected by the Assembly from its membership and shall advise the presiding officer of parliamentary procedure.

Section 5. The secretary and parliamentarian shall be elected at the last regular meeting and shall assume office at the first meeting in the fall semester.

Article V

Section 1. Periodic Assembly meetings will be held and special meetings may be called at the discretion of the President, the Faculty Senate, or on petition of a majority of the members of the faculty.

Section 2. A majority of the membership shall constitute a quorum for any meeting, and each member present shall have one vote. Proxy votes by faculty members absent from Assembly meetings may be cast upon presentation of such proxy to the Provost prior to the meeting.

Section 3. A majority vote of those present shall be sufficient to pass a by-law or recommendation.

Section 4. Meetings shall be conducted according to Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised.

Article VI

It shall be the duty of the President to report to the Assembly, no later than the second regular meeting after a vote is taken, the disposition of any recommendation made by the Assembly.

Article VII

This Constitution may be amended by two-thirds vote of those present at any assembly meeting providing the amendment was publicized at the most recent meeting. Amendments may be distributed in a digital format at least two weeks before voting at a Faculty Assembly meeting, or they may be presented at the final Faculty Assembly meeting and voted on digitally one or more weeks after that meeting.

By-Laws

All policies, regulations, and committees in force at the time of adoption of the Constitution which are not incompatible with the Constitution shall continue in force until changed through normal procedures.

All Standing Committees of the University are required to report annually to the Assembly, and will provide that report and all agendas and minutes to the Office of Institutional Effectiveness electronically; the Discipline Committee need not report the details of the committee deliberations.   The Academic Affairs Committee will make their minutes available.  The yearly reports should be given at the last regular Assembly meeting of the spring semester.

The Faculty Senate is the legislative body of Southern Arkansas University in all academic matters relating to or affecting two or more of the Colleges or the University faculty as a whole. The Faculty Senate may consider matters referred to it by any faculty member or administrative officer; and it may, upon its own initiative, undertake the consideration and the determination of policies or procedures relating to courses, curricula, instruction, and the academic welfare of students and faculty.

Constitution of the Faculty Senate

Preamble

Section 1. The Faculty Senate is the legislative body of Southern Arkansas University in all academic matters relating to or affecting two or more of the colleges of the University Faculty as a whole. The Faculty Senate may consider matters referred to it by any faculty member or administrative officer; and it may, upon its own initiative, undertake the consideration and the determination of policies or procedures relating to courses, curricula, instruction, and the academic welfare of students and faculty.

Section 2. All actions taken by the Faculty Senate are subject to review by a meeting of the entire Faculty Assembly.

Article I. Membership and Organization of the Faculty

Section 1. Faculty members eligible to vote for Faculty Senators shall include those full-time employees of the University who hold the rank of instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, professor, or distinguished professor and who have tenure or tenure-track appointment; those at the rank of assistant professor, associate professor, professor, or distinguished professor may also serve as Faculty Senators. However, any faculty member may bring issues before the Faculty Senate.

Section 2. The Faculty Senate, hereinafter referred to as the Senate, shall serve as the representative and governing body of the faculty of Southern Arkansas University.

Article II. Functions of the Senate

Section 1. Within the limitations stated in the remainder of this Article, the Senate shall have the responsibility to review University policies in all areas which directly pertain to the academic function of Southern Arkansas University, including, but not limited to

      1. admission requirements;
      2. curricula and courses;
      3. degrees and requirements for degrees;
      4. calendar and schedules;
      5. awards and honors;
      6. student affairs;
      7. continuing education;
      8. facilitation of teaching and research;
      9. faculty conduct and discipline;
      10. faculty appointment, retention, tenure, and promotion;
      11. freedom of expression and academic freedom;
      12. interpretation of the Senate’s legislation and policies; and
      13. the necessary and proper implementation of the foregoing powers.

Section 2. The Senate shall have the authority to make recommendations to the University’s President and the Board of Trustees on all institutional matters of direct faculty concern, including, but not limited to

      1. policies regarding faculty status, including appointments, promotions, granting of tenure, retirement, non-reappointment, and dismissal;
      2. policies affecting the general welfare, working conditions, and the services performed by and for the faculty;
      3. policies relating to academic and professional research and other scholarly and creative activities;
      4. selection and removal of the principal administrative officers having university-wide responsibilities, as well as the creation and abolition of such offices;
      5. University budgets; and
      6. the academic calendar.

Section 3. To facilitate the timely review of the policy proposals which pertain to the academic function of the University, each Standing Committee of the University shall forward copies of its minutes to the president of the Senate and to the Office of Institutional Research. The president of the Senate shall bring before the Senate for its review those committee actions which recommend substantial changes or the creation of new policies or procedures that affect institutional matters of direct faculty concern, as identified in Article II, sections 1 and 2.

Section 4. The Senate shall establish such committees as it deems necessary to carry out its functions.

Section 5. The Senate shall consider all matters placed on its agenda by the University and Senate committees, by individual faculty members, by the Provost, or by the President of the University.

Section 6. The elected officers of the Senate shall serve as the Faculty Committee on Committees. Each member on the Committee on Committees shall maintain a list of faculty and endeavor to learn about their interests and abilities as regards service on Standing Committees of the University.

Article III. Membership of the Senate

Section 1. The Senate shall consist of elected members and non-voting ex-officio members as follows:

      1. Elected (voting)
        1. College Senators: Three faculty members from each of the four colleges of the University shall be elected by a secret ballot of the respective colleges in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution.
        2. At-Large Senators: Six faculty members shall be elected by a vote of the entire faculty.
        3. Special Constituency Senators: The Faculty Senate may, by two-thirds of its membership, confer (and rescind) voting representation to any campus special constituency not currently represented on the Senate. The Senate is limited to a maximum of three special constituencies from this classification with one senator for each special constituency. Upon action by the Senate conferring voting representation to the campus special constituency, the membership of the special constituency will elect its representative by secret ballot. The representative will serve a three-year term. Consideration of rescinding the special constituency representation may occur only at the end of a three-year term of the Senator for that special constituency.
        4. Hereinafter, “Senators” refers only to College, At-Large, or Special Constituency Senators.
      2. Ex Officio (non-voting)
        1. Administration: The President, Provost, Vice President for Student Affairs, Vice President for Administration and General Counsel, Vice President for Finance, Vice President for Advancement, and deans of the various colleges and school will serve as ex officio representatives of the University administration.
        2. Support services: An elected representative of the Staff Senate will serve a three-year term as the ex officio representative for the administrative support personnel.
        3. Library: The director of library and information services will serve as an ex officio representative of the University’s librarians and library staff.
        4. Student: The Student Government Association president will serve as an ex officio representative for all students enrolled in the University.

Section 2. No more than three senators shall be from any single department and no more than two chairpersons shall be elected from each college.

Section 3. Elected senators shall serve a term of three years. Vacancies shall be filled by a special election to fill the unexpired term. The election to fill a vacancy shall be by the constituency represented by the vacancy. However, no person shall serve more than two successive full terms.

Section 4. Vacancies for Senate positions shall be filled in three stages. By April 1, the faculty shall elect by secret ballot two senators to fill the vacancies caused by the expiration of the terms of one class of At-Large Senators and shall fill other vacancies as may be required. Subsequent to the election of the At-Large Senators, but no later than April 20, each college shall elect by secret ballot one senator to fill the vacancy caused by the expiration of the term of one class of senators and shall fill other vacancies in the ranks of College Senators as may be required. Subsequent to the election of the College Senators, but no later than April 30, each represented special constituency shall elect by secret ballot a senator as may be required to fill a vacancy.

Section 5. The term of office for newly elected senators shall begin May 1.

Section 6. By written notice to the president of Senate submitted twenty-four hours before a meeting, a member of the Senate may choose another faculty member from the member’s constituency to represent the member at a Senate meeting. Such a representative must be eligible for election to the Senate.

Section 7. In lieu of choosing a replacement representative, a member of the Senate may, by written notice to the Senate president, give a proxy vote to another member of the Senate from that member’s constituency.

Section 8. Proxies and alternate representative shall be announced by the Senate president at the beginning of each meeting when the roll is called.

Section 9. The seat of a member of the Senate who has been repeatedly absent from Senate meetings can be declared vacant by a three-fourths vote of senators attending a meeting. The motion to remove a member of the Senate shall be considered a major item of business.

Article IV. Officers

Section 1. The officers of the Senate shall be as follows: president; vice president, who shall serve as president-elect; secretary-treasurer; and parliamentarian.

Section 2. Eligibility for the election to an office shall be restricted to elected members of the Senate.

Section 3. The term of office for any Senate officer shall be one year or until a successor has been chosen and qualified.

Section 4. The officers of the Senate shall be elected by vote of the elected members of the Senate before May 15 each year.

Section 5. The president of the Senate shall be granted one quarter “release time” so that the functions of the office may be properly carried out. The secretary-treasurer shall notify the Provost of the name of the person selected as Senate vice president (president-elect) so that any necessary schedule changes may be made. Additional “release time” may be granted by the Senate as approved by the Provost.

Section 6. The president of the Senate shall

      1. call for sessions of the Senate and preside over such meetings; and
      2. be empowered to interpret, when necessary, the Constitution, the University Catalog, and all reports issued by any of the Senate Committees.

Section 7. The vice president of the Senate shall

      1. assist the president of the Senate in performing all of the responsibilities incumbent to the position of Senate president;
      2. serve as Chairman of the Committee on Committees which nominates faculty members to the Standing Committees and ad hoc committees; and
      3. act as Senate president at such times when the president may be unable to perform these duties.
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Section 8. The secretary-treasurer of the Senate shall

      1. confirm the presence of a quorum at each meeting of the Senate;
      2. record the minutes of each Senate meeting and distribute within seven working days a draft of the minutes to Senate members. The secretary-treasurer shall also send by e-mail a draft of the minutes to the faculty;
      3. aid the Senate president in election procedures and such other matters as the Senate president may deem appropriate to the office;
      4. file, as soon as possible, a copy of the approved minutes in the Office of the Provost as the official office record. Copies shall similarly be forwarded to the University President and each member of the Board of Trustees; and
      5. be responsible for the Senate budget.

Section 9. The parliamentarian of the Senate shall ensure that the established guidelines described in Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised are adhered to during all regular and special sessions of the Senate.

Article V. Meetings

Section 1. The Senate shall hold regularly scheduled meetings each month of the academic year. The agenda of each meeting will be determined by the elected officers of the Faculty Senate in consultation with the Provost, the President of the University, or any member of the Board of Trustees.

Section 2. The third Thursday of each month shall be reserved for Senate meetings. The Senate shall establish at the April meeting the time at which the Senate shall convene during the following academic year. Senate members shall be responsible for class arrangements.

Section 3. The following order of business shall be observed in meetings of the Faculty Senate unless two-thirds of the senators present vote to change the procedures: 1) call to order, 2) approval of the minutes, 3) special orders of the day, 4) unfinished business, 5) reports of committees, 6) other new business, 7) adjournment.

Section 4. The Senate may be called into special session by the president of the Senate or upon written petition of a majority of the Senate. A notice stating the purpose of any special session must be distributed to the members of the Senate twenty-four hours prior to the meeting.

Section 5. Any faculty member may attend any regular or special session of the Senate and may participate in its deliberations with the consent of the presiding officer. Only senators shall be eligible to propose motions or to vote.

Section 6. A quorum for any meeting of the Senate shall consist of two-thirds of the voting members.

Section 7. The rules of procedure contained in Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised shall govern the proceedings of the Senate, subject to such special rules as may be adopted by the Senate.

Article VI. Standing Committees of the Senate

Section 1. The Standing Committees of the Senate shall be as follows:

      1. Committee on Committees
      2. Handbook Committee
      3. Budget Committee
      4. Parking Appeals Committee

Article VII. Standing Committees of the University

Section 1 (a). University Committees.

      1. Academic Advising Committee
      2. Campus Sustainability Committee
      3. Commencement Committee
      4. Discipline Committee
      5. Faculty/Staff Appeals and Human Rights Committee
      6. Faculty Staff Professional Development Committee
      7. Fringe Benefits Committee
      8. Intercollegiate Athletics Committee
      9. Library Committee
      10. Online and Technology Services Committee
      11. Public Information Committee
      12. Scholarship and Student Financial Aid Committee
      13. Student Affairs Committee
      14. Student Media Committee

Section 1 (b). Academic Committees

      1. Academic Affairs Committee
      2. Academic Integrity Committee
      3. Academic Suspension Appeals Committee
      4. Animal Subjects Committee
      5. Annual Faculty Performance Review Monitoring Committee
      6. Assessment Committee
      7. Faculty Development in Teaching with Technology Committee
      8. General Education Committee
      9. Graduate Council Committee
      10. Honors College Committee
      11. Institutional Review Board for Treatment of Human Subjects
      12. Online Education Committee
      13. Research Committee
      14. Teacher Education Committee
      15. University Tenure and Promotion Council

Section 2. Senate Standing Committees will be elected by the voting members of the Senate.

Section 3. At the beginning of the academic year, the Committee on Committees will review the membership of all Standing Committees of the University and ensure that at least one member of each committee is a senator. If a committee does not have a senator, then the Senate will elect an ex officio, non-voting member to that Committee.

Article VIII. Amendments

Section 1. An amendment to this Constitution may be proposed at any regular meeting of the Senate by a majority vote of the senators, provided a copy of the proposed amendment has been presented to each senator in attendance at the immediately preceding meeting.

Section 2. Any amendment proposed by the Senate shall be submitted to a vote of the University faculty. Each faculty member shall be notified at least two weeks in advance of such a vote and at that time be furnished with a copy of the proposed amendment.

Section 3. An amendment to this Constitution shall become effective upon approval by a majority of the members of the University faculty

Standing Committees of the University

The four major functions of Standing Committees of the University are

    • to recommend policy appropriate to the mission of the committee,
    • to act as advisory groups to the administrative officers,
    • to act as investigating bodies, and
    • to perform administrative functions, such as those of the Discipline Committee.

In performance of their duties, the Standing Committees of the University operate through regular channels of procedure. In developing a new policy or changing an old policy, except those designated as administrative, the initial action is started by or referred to the appropriate committee. To facilitate timely information about the policy proposals that pertain to the academic function of the University, each Standing Committee of the University shall have a Faculty Senate Representative who serves as the liaison between the Senate and the committee and is responsible for communicating the committee deliberations and the minutes to the Senate.

When a Standing Committee of the University has a recommendation concerning an academic matter relating to or affecting two or more of the Colleges or the University faculty as a whole, the recommendation may be brought before the Faculty Senate. In addition, the Faculty Senate may consider matters referred to it by any faculty member or administrative officer, and it may upon its own initiative undertake the consideration of and make recommendations about policies and procedures related to the functions of the Senate.

Recommendations from the Faculty Senate are subject to review by the Faculty Assembly. The Assembly, by majority vote, may send any recommendation of the Faculty Senate back to the body for review. The Faculty Assembly’s acceptance of the Faculty Senate’s recommendation (perhaps as amended) constitutes a recommendation to the President of the University, who may accept or reject the recommendation. When the President of the University accepts a recommendation, the President presents the recommendation to the Board of Trustees for its approval, when appropriate. Upon the Board’s approval, the proposed policy or program becomes an established part of the University program. If the President rejects a recommendation, the Faculty Senate may appeal to the Board of Trustees.

The administration of an existing policy is the responsibility of the administrative person involved, but that individual may seek advice and help from the advisory committee.

The Standing Committees of the University are divided into two categories: “University” and “Academic.” Faculty membership in all Standing University and Academic Committees is determined by faculty election within each college under the supervision of the Faculty Senate Committee on Committees. If no senator is elected to any standing committee, the Faculty Senate will elect a senator to serve as a non-voting, ex officio member.

Unless otherwise noted in Committee descriptions, student membership on standing committees is determined by appointment from the Student Government Association. Membership on Standing Committees, other than faculty and student members, is by presidential appointment.

The Senate’s president or the vice president may also appoint ad hoc committees at any time to study special problems.

Tenured, tenure-track, and non-tenure-track faculty members with a teaching load equal to or greater than 50 percent are eligible for election to University and Academic Committees.

The Faculty Senate will provide a list of committee openings to the dean of each college no later than the day of the opening General Faculty meeting for the fall semester. Each college will have ten (10) days to conduct elections for all committee openings and will forward all election results to the Faculty Senate. Unless otherwise noted, election is for staggered two-year terms with half of the committee membership elected each year.

Following is a description of the mission and membership profile of each standing committee.

  1. University Committees

    1. Academic Advising Committee
      1. Mission
        1. Review policies and processes related to advising and registration
        2. Provide professional development and training activities
        3. Make recommendations to utilize best practices and resource in academic advising
        4. Advocate for advising
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Academic Dean, one (1) appointed by the Provost
        4. Dean of Enrollment Services
        5. Registrar’s Office staff, one (1)
        6. Director of Advising Center
        7. Staff, two (2) appointed by the President
        8. Students, two (2)
      3. All ex officio are non-voting
        1. Provost, ex officio
        2. Vice President for Student Affairs
        3. Dean, School of Graduate Studies
        4. Faculty Senator (if one is not elected to the committee), ex officio
        5. Staff Senator (if one is not already elected to the committee), ex officio
    2. Campus Sustainability Committee
      1. Mission: To cultivate a culture of environmental responsibility in which the SAU community is aware of, engaged in, and committed to advancing environmental awareness and sustainable practices through education, research, operations, and campus community service activities. Further, the committee will identify and recommend to the University President specific actions and strategic plans the University community can pursue to move the University towards greater environmental sustainability in its operations, research, teaching, and service/outreach functions. Upon plan approval, the committee will collaborate with on-campus and off-campus groups to implement these actions and plans and sustain them over time.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Staff, four (4) appointed by the President
        4. Students, two (2)
      3. Ex Officio (non-voting)
        1. Vice President for Administration
        2. Vice President for Student Affairs
        3. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        4. Liaison to Staff Senate
    3. Commencement Committee
      1. Mission: To plan and make necessary arrangements for commencement in May, August, and December each year.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, Registrar
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Dean, one (1) appointed by the Provost
        4. Staff, two (2) appointed by the President
        5. Students, two (2)
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Provost
        2. Vice President for Student Affairs
        3. Vice President for Finance
        4. Vice President for Advancement
        5. Director of Communications Center
        6. Bookstore Manager
        7. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        8. Liaison to Staff Senate
    4. Discipline Committee
      1. Mission: The committee serves as the review/appeal body for consideration of cases related to student or student organization misconduct when the Dean of Students has imposed disciplinary action or has affirmed disciplinary action imposed by a student affairs staff member. Review may be granted for allegations of failure to process the disciplinary action according to University policy or severity of discipline imposed.
      2. Membership: This committee is appointed by the President from faculty, staff, and student volunteers who are willing to undergo training in student judicial affairs process. This training will provide guidance into methods to ensure due process and other current student judicial affairs issues and developments. The appointments are for two-year terms and any combination of primary and alternate can meet to obtain seven members. Alternates become primary in the second year.
        1. Chair, (may be a faculty or staff member, not already a member of the committee)
        2. Faculty, two (2) primary and two (2) alternates
        3. Staff, two (2) primary and two (2) alternates
        4. Students, two (2) primary and two (2) alternates
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        2. Liaison to Staff Senate
    5. Faculty/Staff Appeals and Human Rights Committee
      1. Mission: To hear all appeals based on non-academic personnel issues; on academic issues related to academic freedom, curricula, salary, and non-reappointment; and student issues for which an appeal structure does not exist. In addition, the committee monitors the University’s efforts to comply with desegregation and affirmative action plans and brings any discrimination complaints and grievances to the attention of the administration. Recommendations of the committee regarding faculty and staff appeals are sent to the President. Recommendations of the committee regarding student appeals are sent to the Vice President for Student Affairs.
        1. Committee of the whole:
          1. Mission: To monitor compliance with desegregation and affirmative action plans and issues of discrimination.
          2. Membership:
            1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
            2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
            3. Academic administrators, two (2) below vice president rank
            4. Staff, four (4) staff appointed by the President
            5. Administrator, one (1) below vice president rank
            6. Students, two (2) appointed to serve only when issues of student discrimination are involved
        2. Staff Appeals Subcommittee
          1. Mission: To hear all appeals based on non-academic personnel issues.
          2. Membership:
            1. Chair, appointed by the President from the subcommittee membership
            2. Staff, four (4) staff appointed by the President
            3. Administrator, one (1) below vice president rank
        3. Faculty Appeals Subcommittee
          1. Mission: To hear all appeals based on academic issues related to academic freedom, curricula, salary, and non-reappointment.
          2. Membership
            1. Chair (also chair of the committee of the whole)
            2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
            3. Academic Administrators, two (2) below vice president rank
        4. Student Appeals Subcommittee
          1. Mission: To hear all student appeals for which an appeal structure does not exist.
          2. Membership (designated when appeal filed by overall committee chair and Office of Vice President for Administration and General Counsel):
            1. Chair, faculty or staff from the subcommittee
            2. Faculty, one (1) member from the committee
            3. Staff, one (1) member from the committee
            4. Student, one (1) member from the committee
            5. Administrative Coordinator and Legal Advisor
            6. Vice President for Administration and General Counsel
          3. Ex officio (non-voting)
            1. Provost
            2. Vice President for Administration
            3. Vice President for Finance
            4. Vice President for Student Affairs
            5. Vice President for Advancement
            6. Liaison to Faculty Senate
            7. Liaison to Staff Senate
    6. Faculty and Staff Professional Development Committee
      1. Mission: To maintain a professional development system for faculty and staff that regularly surveys faculty and staff for their professional development needs, analyze survey results, and coordinate and plan for professional program offerings.
      2. Membership
        1. Co-Chairs, two (2), one (1) faculty co-chair, and one (1) staff co-chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, five (5), one (1) from each college and one (1) from graduate studies
        3. Staff, five (5), one (1) from each of the vice presidents’ departments
      3. All ex officio are no-voting
        1. Continuing Education Coordinator
        2. Provost, ex officio
        3. Vice President for Student Affairs, ex officio
        4. Vice President for Advancement , ex officio
        5. Vice President for Administration and General counsel, ex officio
        6. Vice President for Finance, ex officio
        7. Faculty Senator (if one is not elected to the committee), ex officio
        8. Staff Senator (if one is not already elected to the committee), ex officio
    7. Fringe Benefits Committee
      1. Mission: To review and recommend policies that affect health insurance coverage and other fringe benefits for appointed faculty and staff employed one-half time by the University.
      2. Membership
        1. Chair, Vice President for Administration
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Staff, two (2) appointed by the President
        4. Representative from Business Affairs, appointed by the President
        5. Representative from Student Health Services, appointed by the President
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Vice President for Finance
        2. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        3. Liaison to Staff Senate
    8. Intercollegiate Athletics Committee
      1. Mission: To assure institutional compliance in all athletic alliances and with accrediting agencies. The committee also makes recommendations on athletic related matters.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. NCAA Faculty Athletic Representative
        4. Senior Women’s Administrator
        5. Staff, two (2), appointed by the President
        6. Students, two (2)
        7. Booster, one (1), appointed by the President
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1.  Registrar
        2. Athletic Director
        3. Vice President for Finance or designee
        4. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        5. Liaison to Staff Senate
    9. Library Committee
      1. Mission: To propose policies concerning the services and uses of the library.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Dean, one (1) appointed by the Provost
        4. Staff, two (2) appointed by the President
        5. Students, two (2)
        6. Archives Librarian
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Director of Library and Information Services
        2. Provost
        3. Representative of University Technology Services
        4. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        5. Liaison to Staff Senate
    10. Public Information Committee
      1. Mission: To support and advise the Office of Communication Services in efforts to enhance the image of the University by promoting activities and accomplishments of students, faculty, and staff in addition to the University’s vision, mission, and strengths.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Staff, two (2) (appointed by the President), one (1) from Student Affairs area and one (1) from Finance and Administrative Services area
        4. Students, two (2)
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Director of Communications Center
        2. Vice President for Student Affairs
        3. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        4. Liaison to Staff Senate
    11. Scholarship and Student Financial Aid Committee
      1. Mission: To propose regulations governing the award and continuation of scholarships and student financial aid; to explore the possibilities for new scholarship funds; and to find new ways to inform students, faculty, staff, and the public about the University’s scholarship program and student financial aid.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Staff, two (2) (appointed by the President), one (1) from Student Affairs area and one (1) from Office of Student Life
        4. Athletic Director
        5. Students, two (2)
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Director of Financial Aid
        2. Vice President for Student Affairs
        3. Office of Accounting representative
        4. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        5. Liaison to Staff Senate
    12. Student Affairs Committee
      1. Mission: To study and recommend policy involving student development, placement, security, student activities, counseling, housing, student conduct, physical and mental health, and activities related to students’ out-of-class welfare.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Staff, two (2) appointed by the President
        4. Students, one (1) from each of the following groups:
          1. Association of Residence Halls
          2. Inter-Greek Council
          3. Non-traditional student
          4. Minority student
        5. Dean of Students
        6. Assistant Dean for Student Activities
        7. President of the Student Government Association
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Vice President for Student Affairs
        2. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        3. Liaison to Staff Senate
    13. Student Media Committee
      1. Mission: To maintain oversight of the student media.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Students, two (2)
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Media Advisor(s)
        2. Vice President for Finance or designee
        3. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        4. Liaison to Staff Senate
    14. Online and Technology Services Committee
      1. Mission: To recommend policies and procedures related to online services and other information technology issues affecting the campus.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Dean, one (1) appointed by the Provost
        4. Staff, two (2) appointed by the President
        5. Students, two (2)
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Director of Library and Information Services
        2. Director of Information Technology
        3. Representative from SAU-Tech
        4. Provost
        5. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        6. Liaison to Staff Senate
  2. Academic Committees

    1. Academic Affairs Committee
      1. Mission: To recommend and propose policies involving curricula, academic standards, transfer credits, and special offerings. This includes acting on recommendations from the Graduate Council Committee and the General Education Committee.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, Provost (votes in case of tie)
        2. Faculty, five (5), one (1) from each college and one (1) from graduate faculty
        3. Deans, five (5), one (1) from each college and School of Graduate Studies
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Students, two (2)
        2. Vice President for Student Affairs
        3. Director of Library and Information Services
        4. Registrar
        5. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        6. Liaison to Staff Senate
    2. Academic Integrity Council
      1. Mission: The Council serves as the review/appeal body for consideration of allegations of Academic Integrity Policy Violations.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4) (two-year staggered terms), one from each college
        3. Dean of Students
        4. Students, three (3), appointed by the Student Government Association
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        2. Liaison to Staff Senate
    3. Academic Suspension Appeals Committee
      1. Mission: To administer the probation and suspension policies that are set up by the administration and faculty, recommend changes in those policies to the Academic Affairs Committee, and see that information about probation regulations is disseminated to the students.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, eight (8), two (2) from each college
        3. If an elected member cannot attend a meeting, the Senate President shall appoint a substitute from that member’s college for that meeting, so that at least four voting members are present.
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1.  Provost
        2. Vice President for Student Affairs
        3. Registrar
        4. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        5. Liaison to Staff Senate
    4. Animal Subjects Committee
      1. Mission: To maintain oversight of the humane care and treatment of animals used in research.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), three (3) from the College of Science and Engineering and one (1) from the College of Liberal and Performing Arts involved in a non-scientific area
        3. One (1) member not affiliated with the University, appointed by the President
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Students, two (2)
        2. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        3. Liaison to Staff Senate
      4. Membership must meet Public Health Service Policy, IV. A.3.B:
        1. “The committee shall consist of not less than five members, and shall include at least:
          1. One doctor of Veterinary Medicine, with training or experience in laboratory animal science and medicine, who has direct or delegated program authority and responsibility for activities involving animals at the institution.
          2. One practicing scientist experienced in research involving animals,
          3. One member whose primary concerns are in a nonscientific area (for example, ethicist, lawyer, member of the clergy).
          4. One individual who is not affiliated with the institution in any way other than as a member of the IACUC (in the original PHSP document, IACUC stands for Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee), and is not a member of the immediate family of a person who is affiliated with the institution.”
        2. PHS policy IC. A. 3. C states:
          1. An individual who meets the requirements of more than one of the categories detailed in IV. A. 3. B. 1-4 of this policy may fulfill more than one requirement. However, no committee may consist of less than five members.
    5. Annual Faculty Performance Review Monitoring Committee
      1. Mission: To review the overall SAU Annual Faculty Performance Review plan (which includes evaluation of faculty by administrators, peers, and students) in order to ascertain its academic effectiveness and to ensure that its process is rigorously and consistently applied. The Committee will meet following written request(s) for re-evaluation of the annual faculty performance review process, as well as each spring semester. (See Faculty Handbook Section VIII, “Evaluation of Faculty and Administrators”)
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, Provost (votes in case of tie)
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Deans, four (4), one (1) from each college
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Vice President for Administration
        2. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        3. Liaison to Staff Senate
    6. Assessment Review Council
      1. Mission: To foster improvement of the assessment of student learning outcomes throughout the University by compiling and sharing information, making recommendations, and providing guidance and feedback to departments, faculty, and students.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, Assessment Coordinator, appointed from the faculty by the President (votes in case of tie)
        2. Faculty, five (5), one (1) from each college and the assessment coordinator
        3. Dean, one (1), appointed by the President
        4. Students, two (2) selected by the committee from departmental recommendations
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1.  Provost
        2. Director of Institutional Research
        3. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        4. Liaison to Staff Senate
    7. Faculty Development in Teaching with Technology Committee
      1. Mission: To review, recommend, and/or propose uses of advanced technology for instructional and other academic purposes.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed from the faculty by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Students, two (2)
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Director of Continuing Education
        2. Dean of School of Graduate Studies
        3. Director of Information Technology
        4. Dean, one (1) appointed by the Provost
        5. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        6. Liaison to Staff Senate
    8. General Education Committee
      1. Mission: To recommend or propose policies and practices pertaining to the University’s general education curriculum.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, dean of the College of Liberal and Performing Arts
        2. Faculty, eight (8), two (2) from each college
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Dean, four (4), one (1) from each college
        2. Provost
        3. Students, two (2)
        4. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        5. Liaison to Staff Senate
    9. Graduate Council
      1. Mission: To review and recommend all policies and procedures pertaining to the graduate programs of the University.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, dean of the School for Graduate Studies (votes in case of tie)
        2. Graduate Faculty, elected for three-year term, one (1) from each degree program area
        3. At-Large Representative (i.e., non-program representative), one (1) elected for three-year term
        4. Graduate Student Representative, one (1) appointed annually by the dean of the School of Graduate Studies
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1.  Provost
        2. Registrar
        3. Coordinator of Assessment
        4. One representative from each college, appointed by the college dean, if not represented by current degree programs
        5. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        6. Liaison to Staff Senate
    10. Honors College Committee
      1. Mission: To encourage intellectual and academic growth of the University community by giving academically prepared students the opportunity to pursue challenging and stimulating academic experiences.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, Honors College Director
        2. Students, two (2) Honors College residents
        3. Staff, two (2), one (1) from housing and one (1) from admissions/enrollment services
        4. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1.  Provost
        2. Vice President for Student Affairs
        3. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        4. Liaison to Staff Senate
    11. Institutional Review Board for Treatment of Human Subjects
      1. Mission: To ensure that human subjects research conducted by University personnel is in compliance with the Department of Health and Human Services regulations (CFR) Title 45, Part 46 – Protection of Human Subjects, all voting members must complete National Institute of Health certification on an annual basis.
      2.  Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, eight (8), two (2) from each of the colleges, each elected to a four-year term, with provision determined for staggering terms
        3. Area Physician, one (1), appointed by the President
        4. Community Member (must be non-affiliated with SAU: no financial or personal interest in the University)
        5. Students, two (2). Voting members, but only one can vote on each proposal. At least one of the students must be an undergraduate student.
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        2. Liaison to Staff Senate
    12. Online Education Committee
      1. Mission: to address online education challenges and opportunities at SAU. Specifically,
        1. recommend institutional guidelines to ensure quality in online courses;
        2. organize ongoing support and assistance for online faculty and students; and
        3. explore emerging technologies to support teaching and learning.
      2. Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty teaching online, eight (8), two (2) from each college
        3. Academic Dean, one (1) appointed by the Provost
        4. Director of Institutional Effectiveness
        5. Students, two (2)
      3. All ex officio are non-voting
        1. Provost
        2. Director of Online Learning
        3. Director of Library and Information Services
        4. Faculty Senator (if one is not elected to the committee)
        5. Staff Senator
    13. Research Committee
      1. Mission: To review, recommend, and/or propose research activity which is of interest to Southern Arkansas University.
      2. Membership
        1. Chair, appointed by the President from the committee membership
        2. Faculty, four (4), one (1) from each college
        3. Students, two (2)
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Director of Continuing Education
        2. Dean of School of Graduate Studies
        3. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        4. Liaison to Staff Senate
    14. Teacher Education Committee
      1. Mission: To recommend, monitor, and evaluate programs and policies governing teacher education.
      2. Membership
        1. Chair, Dean of the College of Education
        2. Faculty, eight (8), as represented by these areas:
          1. Counseling and Professional Studies, one (1)
          2. Teacher Education, one (1), two-year term
          3. Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation, one (1)
          4. Director of AFEL
          5. Coordinator, NCATE
          6. Coordinator, M.Ed. and MAT online
          7. College of Liberal and Performing Arts–Music, one (1)
          8. College of Liberal and Performing Arts, one (1)
          9. College of Science and Engineering, one (1)
          10. David F. Rankin College of Business, one (1)
        3. Undergraduate Education Student, one (1), appointed by Student Government Association
        4. Graduate Education Student, one (1), appointed by Graduate Council
        5. Public/Private P-12 Teacher, one (1), appointed by Dean of the College of Education
        6. Public/Private P-12 Administrator, one (1), appointed by Dean of the College of Education
      3. Ex officio (non-voting)
        1. Provost
        2. Dean of School of Graduate Studies
        3. Registrar
        4. Director of Library and Information Services
        5. Education Renewal Zone Director
        6. Liaison to Faculty Senate
        7. Liaison to Staff Senate
    15. University Tenure and Promotion Council
      1. Mission: To review and evaluate all applications for promotion and/or tenure and to submit recommendations for promotion and/or tenure to the Provost.
      2. Membership
        1. Chair, Provost (non-voting)
        2. Faculty, eight (8), two (2) from each college; must be senior tenured faculty, 2-year terms, with four (4) being elected each year, one (1) from each college. If the elected faculty representative chooses to seek promotion or tenure, the representative’s college will elect a replacement.

Representatives cannot serve two consecutive terms on the Council. Each college should develop a schedule which allows for rotation among departments within the college.

Faculty members may serve on both the College Council and the University Council. If an elected University Council representative is not on the respective College Council, the representative will attend all meetings of the College Council.

Executive Council, Quality Leadership Team, and Quality Control

 Preamble

Section 1. Southern Arkansas University is committed to a philosophy of continuous quality improvement that supports the University’s ongoing accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC). The Quality Executive Council (QEC) oversees and approves the University’s continuous improvement initiatives, University strategic plan, and accreditation processes. The Quality Leadership Team (QLT) monitors assessment, coordinates quality improvement initiatives, and manages the HLC accreditation processes.

Section 2. Recommendations from the QEC that relate to faculty governance issues are forwarded to the Faculty Senate and are subject to review by a meeting of the entire Faculty Assembly.

Section 3. Recommendations from the QEC that relate to staff governance issues are forwarded to the Staff Senate and are subject to review by a meeting of the entire Staff Assembly.

Article I. Membership and Organization of the Quality Executive Council

Section 1. Members of the QEC are appointed by the President of the University. Other members include the Provost and other appointed vice presidents, a member of the Board of Trustees, an academic dean, the QLT, the president of the Faculty Senate, and the president of the Staff Senate.

Section 2. The QEC reviews actions and recommendations, reviews documents submitted to the HLC, and recommends the University strategic plan to the Board of Trustees for final approval.

Article II. Membership and Organization of the Quality Leadership Team

Section 1. Members of the QLT are appointed by the President of the University. The Office of Institutional Effectiveness coordinates the QLT, which includes the accreditation coordinators and other appointed members.

Section 2. The QLT recommends quality improvement initiatives and coordinates preparation of all accreditation documents and activities.

 Article III. Meetings

 Section 1. The QEC meets once per month during the academic year.

Section 2. The QLT meets regularly.

 

Academic Policies

  1. Policies Related to Teaching Assignments and Scheduling

    1. University Calendar

      1. The calendar for the school year is made up by the Provost and is published on the SAU website Academic Calendar.

    2. Teaching Assignments

      1. Teaching assignments for each semester and summer term are recommended by the department chairs and deans of each college and approved by the Provost. Within the limitations set by curriculum needs and the requirements of a practical schedule, each college recommends the courses to be taught and the hours at which they will be offered. Class schedules are prepared utilizing the two-year cycle of courses.

    3. Classroom Use

      1. Since factors such as suitability to course requirements, needs of classes, and convenience for an instructor help determine the assignment of classrooms, instructors may not change classrooms without approval from the Office of the Provost.

    4. Meeting of Classes/Faculty Absence

      1. Faculty members are expected to meet their classes at the regularly scheduled time, on time, and for the entire length of time for which each class (or laboratory) is scheduled. In anticipation of absence for such legitimate purposes as attending a meeting of a professional organization, representing the University officially, or participating in the program, the faculty member, after consultation with the department chair, should make provision for classes to be missed. The Office of the Provost will provide a form on which the faculty member will indicate the reason for absence, date of absence(s), and arrangements made for the class(es) to be missed, which will be submitted in advance to the office of the appropriate dean, who forwards the form, if approved, to the Office of the Provost.

    5. Emergencies

      1. When an emergency arises, such as illness, the faculty member should, as soon as possible, inform the department chair, who will contact the college dean. If it is not possible to locate the department chair or dean, the faculty should report to the Provost.

    6. Office Hours

      1. For the convenience of students and others who may wish to contact them, faculty members will post on their office doors and on Blackboard each semester a schedule which shows their classes and identifies at least eight hours (for full-time faculty, prorated for part-time) per week of regularly scheduled office hours. College requirements may exceed eight hours per week.

      2. During posted office hours, faculty members will be in their offices or will leave clear messages where they can be reached and/or when they will return.

    7. Teaching Load

      1. The normal full-time teaching load for full-time faculty in tenured or tenure-track positions is twelve (12) semester hours or the equivalent per semester. The normal load for full-time faculty teaching only graduate courses does not exceed nine (9) hours. The load of a faculty member teaching both graduate and undergraduate courses is an appropriate proration of graduate and undergraduate hours. The normal load for full-time faculty hired as instructors into non-tenure-track positions is fifteen (15) semester hours or the equivalent per semester. The value in credit hours given to various activities is determined through deliberation and consultation among the faculty of the department offering the credit, the chair of the department, the college dean, and the Provost. If an instructor is asked to teach an overload, the instructor will be compensated for it.

      2. In the infrequent circumstance in which a faculty member’s load for a semester does not equal the normal load (for example, because a scheduled course has been cancelled), the instructor, the instructor’s dean, department chair, and the Provost, through consultation with one another, will determine assignments for the instructor that will bring the instructor’s load for the semester to the contractual level. Such assignments may include assisting teachers with heavy teaching loads, being responsible for non-instructional duties deemed important by the administration, or teaching an irregularly scheduled course such as a short course, a Saturday class, a night class, an outreach course, or a course in a succeeding semester or intersession.

      3. The administration may approve the teaching of small classes under the following conditions: the class is necessary for the timely completion of graduation requirements by the students enrolled (such as a course which is offered only in two-year rotation of courses or requires individualized instruction or use of limited facilities or equipment). The Provost will consult with the dean of the college, who will consult with the chair of the department, who will consult with the faculty member to determine whether the course will be taught and the circumstances under which it will be taught. They will weigh matters such as the nature of the course, the number of students enrolled in the course, the number of students taught by the faculty member, and the number of different preparations the faculty member is responsible for during the semester.

    8. Outreach, Saturday, and Night Courses That Carry Semester Credit Hours

      1. Teaching methods and procedures of outreach, Saturday, and night courses that carry semester credit hours, while employing methods appropriate to the course and the circumstances of the class, will conform to the same academic standards and contact hour requirements used in regular courses. When a student is enrolled in residence and desires to take at the same time an outreach course for credit towards a degree, the student must obtain the approval of the appropriate dean.

      2. Instructors of outreach, Saturday, and night classes will have the same qualifications as regular instructors.

      3. Adequate laboratory and library facilities when required must be available in towns where outreach courses are offered.

      4. Outreach courses should be self-supporting. The amount of payment for teaching a course is to be determined by the administration.

      5. Decisions as to scheduling of outreach, Saturday, and night classes will be worked out between the affected college and the Office of Provost and VPAA based upon such factors as student demand, availability of instructors, budget, and teaching facilities.

    9. Vocational and Technical Short Courses, Non-Credit

      1. Non-credit vocational and technical short courses may be offered on request as a public service to aid in training employees of nearby industries. There are no prerequisites, and the student does not need to meet University entrance requirements to be admitted to these courses. Courses given under this program must be self-supporting. Outside agencies may be used to give training in non-credit courses. All non-credit courses should be coordinated by the Division of Continuing Education.

    10. Online Instructor Qualification Policy

      1. Faculty who have taught online courses for SAU prior to Fall 2018 (including part-time faculty). Effective Fall 2018, faculty with previous online experience at SAU assigned to teach an online course(s) must complete the Applying the Quality Matters Rubric (APPQMR) online course or the Quality Matters Self Review (see the two options below) within one year of being assigned an online course in order to continue teaching online courses.

        • Obtain APPQMR Certification

        • OR

        • Complete the Quality Matters Self Review assisted by a certified APPQMR faculty member.

      2. Faculty who have not taught online courses for SAU prior to Fall 2018 (including part-time faculty) assigned to teach an online course(s) must complete the following in order to teach online courses:

        • Online Faculty Primer (prior to teaching), and

        • Obtain APPQMR Certification (ideally before teaching online, but within the first year of teaching an online course)

      3. Faculty not meeting qualifications can facilitate a course designed by APPQMR trained faculty/team.

  2. Policies Related to Examinations and Assigning of Grades

    1. Examinations

      1. Each instructor is personally charged with the responsibility of keeping examination papers from falling into students’ possession before examination time.

      2. Final Examination

        1. There shall be no exemptions from final examinations.
        2. All one-hour courses will hold the final examination at the last regularly scheduled class meeting.
        3. Final examinations will be given according to the published final examination schedule.
      3. Special Examinations
        1. Any examination—final, periodic, standardized, or exemption—given outside its regularly scheduled time is a special examination. Instructors who wish to give a class examination at any time other than during the regular class period or scheduled exam period must obtain approval of the Provost at least one week in advance for the proposed examination.
      4. Credit Examinations
        1. The University participates in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) sponsored by the Educational Testing Service. In addition, the institution makes available subject examinations in areas not covered by CLEP. Details of this program are outlined in the University Catalog.
      5. Make-up Examinations/Credit for Class Absences
        1. Make-up credit for work missed will be given under any one of the following conditions:
          1. Student is excused in advance for due cause determined by the Provost. This will include, but not be limited to, absences due to academic program or course field trips and events, inter-collegiate athletics, or school-sponsored lectures.
          2. Student has been ill and has a written excuse from the University nurse or personal physician.
          3. Student is excused by the instructor for emergency reasons.
        2. The types of work missed for which makeup credit may be given include major examinations, homework, presentations, and attendance. Work given to a student for makeup does not have to be in the same format as work missed but must be of equivalent credit.
        3. The absent student must contact the instructor no later than the start of the next class attended in that course to make arrangements for the makeup work. A student who fails to make arrangements prior to commencement of the next class attended forfeits the right to makeup credit, though the instructor may, for good cause, choose to allow makeup credit.
        4. A student is responsible for notifying all instructors as soon as possible when the reason for an absence is known in advance. A student forfeits the right to makeup credit for failing to meet this requirement, though the instructor may, for good cause, choose to allow makeup credit. Notification by administrative or instructional staff of a student’s absence, either before or after the absence, does not relieve the student of the responsibility for personal notification.
    2. Grading System

      1. The grading system used at Southern Arkansas University is described in the University Catalog. In addition to the grades of A, B, C, D, and, F, as described in the Catalog, the following grades may be given under certain circumstances:

        1. The grade of AU may be given only if a student has registered as “Audit” for a course.

        2. The grade of CR may be given only if the student has registered for credit only.

        3. The grade of P may be given only in courses designated as pass/fail.

        4. The grade of I is given only to students whose work is incomplete because of circumstances beyond their control, and it is given at the discretion of the instructor. A student who receives a grade of I must complete the required work for the course in which the grade was received during the next regular semester (i.e., spring or fall semester). The work must be completed and the grade changed by the instructor prior to the week before final examinations of that semester. A grade of I which is not changed by that point automatically becomes an F.

        5. The grade of NC is given only in certain classes which have made provisions for such a grade, and it is given at the discretion of the instructor only to students who have made a sincere and vigorous effort to do the work of the course satisfactorily (including attending regularly) but have not met the requirements of the course.

        6. The grade of W is given by the Registrar to students who have officially dropped a course before the deadline for such action. The grade WF may be assigned by instructors to students who were failing at the time of their withdrawal from the University after the deadline for dropping a course, or to students who come under the provisions of the Attendance Policy of the University, described in the University Catalog. Alternatively, instructors who remove a student for non-attendance may, at their discretion, assign a grade of WN (for “withdrawn for nonattendance”). While the WF grade is calculated in student grade points as an F, the grade WN removes the course from consideration in calculation of grade point.

        7. Consistent with the Academic Integrity Policy, the grade of XF is given in a class when students violate the policy at Level 2 or Level 3 (see policy below).

    3. Mid-Semester Grades

      1. Mid-semester grades will be distributed for developmental courses, 1000 level courses, and 2000 level general education courses only. Faculty are strongly encouraged to provide mid-semester grades in all undergraduate courses, when prompted by the Office of the Registrar.

    4. Semester Grades

      1. Semester grades will be electronically submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the time announced by the Provost and VPAA and Registrar. The Registrar is responsible for distributing students’ grades at the end of the semester.

    5. Grade Changes

      1. After semester or summer session grades have been submitted to the Registrar, changes may be made only through one of the following conditions:

        1. The instructor who assigned the original grade chooses (as a result of recalculation, completion of course requirements, or on the basis of appeal from the student) to initiate a Grade Change Request, in which the instructor outlines the reasons for the change. (Forms used in processing a grade change of this sort are available from the Registrar.) The college dean and Provost must approve such a request.

        2. The “Student Grade Appeal Policy” described in the current University Catalog concludes with a decision that a grade is to be changed (in which case the dean of the college initiates the Grade Change Request). The instructor involved will be notified by the dean. The appeal time limit (three weeks after the beginning of the next semester) will be extended indefinitely in any case where clear and compelling evidence is presented that the student has been unjustly awarded a grade. In cases of administrative withdrawal from the University during the semester the student is enrolled, signatures of all current course faculty are required for the student to be administratively withdrawn. If a WF has been previously assigned, the grade will be changed to W if the instructor agrees to such change. If the instructor does not, the student may appeal the WF through the “Student Grade Appeal Policy” defined in the University Catalog.

        3. The administration initiates a withdrawal from the University on behalf of the student. For administrative withdrawal, all grades posted to the student’s record will be changed according to the policy described in the current University Catalog. Administrative withdrawal will be used only in extraordinary circumstances such as medical conditions, nonacademic suspensions, family emergencies, erroneous enrollment (defined as a student’s inadvertently remaining enrolled in a course the student did not intend to be enrolled in), or situations clearly beyond the control of the student. The administrator initiating the withdrawal must personally sign the request for withdrawal. Administrative withdrawal for medical reasons requires that a written statement from the attending physical be placed in the student’s permanent academic record. All instructors involved must be consulted by the most expeditious means before grades are changed by the Registrar. If the instructor is not available, the appropriate dean will be consulted in a like manner. The instructors involved have the option of sending to the Registrar a memorandum of concurrence/non-concurrence that will be placed in the student’s permanent academic file.

      2. Under no other circumstances may a grade be changed by an employee of the University.

  3. Academic Integrity Policy

    1. The mission of Southern Arkansas University empowers all members of the University community to develop and encourage learning environments that create, expand, acquire, share, evaluate, and communicate knowledge. Academic integrity at SAU is an organizational and individual responsibility. Students, faculty, and staff share responsibility for maintaining the highest standards for academic integrity.

      1. Academic Misconduct Definitions

        1. Any act of dishonesty in academic work constitutes academic misconduct and is subject to disciplinary action. Acts of dishonesty include, but are not limited to, plagiarism, cheating, and fabrication.

          1. Plagiarism

            1. Plagiarism is the act of taking and/or using the ideas, work, and/or writings of another person as one’s own. Plagiarism occurs both when the words of another (in print, electronic, or any other medium) are reproduced without acknowledgement and when the ideas or arguments of another are paraphrased in such a way as to lead the reader to believe that they originated with the writer.

            2. To avoid plagiarism, give written credit and acknowledgement to the source of thoughts, ideas, and/or words, whether you have used direct quotation, paraphrasing, or just a reference to a general idea.

            3. If you directly quote works written by someone else, enclose the quotation with quotation marks and provide an appropriate citation (e.g., footnote, endnote, bibliographical reference).

            4. All course work including research performed and all assignments such as a written paper, must be the work of the person seeking academic credit for the course. Under no circumstances can purchased papers, book reports, projects and/or other class assignments, or work otherwise obtained from individuals or companies be submitted as work of the student.

            5. It is not sufficient to provide a citation if the words of another have been reproduced – this also requires quotation marks. It is the responsibility of all University students to understand the methods of proper attribution and to apply those principles in all materials submitted.

          2. Cheating

            1. Cheating is an act of dishonesty with the intention of obtaining and/or using information in a fraudulent manner. Examples of cheating include

              1. observing and/or copying from another student’s test paper, report, computer file, and/or other assignments;

              2. giving or receiving assistance during an examination period. This includes providing specific answers to subsequent examinees and/or dispensing or receiving information which would allow a student to have an unfair advantage in the examination over students who did not possess such information;

              3. using class notes, outlines, and other unauthorized information during an examination period unless permission is specifically given;

              4. using, buying, selling, stealing, transporting, or soliciting, in part or entirety, the contents of an examination or other assignment not authorized by the professor of the class. This includes the uploading of quizzes, examinations, or any other graded material, with or without answers, to a third-party website; and

              5. exchanging places with another person for the purposes of taking an examination or completing other assignments.

          3. Fabrication

            1. Fabrication is faking or forging a document, signature, or findings of a research project. Other forms of fabrication may include

              1. unauthorized collaboration or submitting the same paper or portions of the same paper to two different courses without the consent of current instructor, or

              2. forging a signature on an official SAU or other document.

      2. Academic Integrity Policy Application to All Students

        1. The University’s academic integrity policy applies to all students enrolled in courses at the University. All forms of academic misconduct at SAU will be regarded as serious and may result in the student being expelled from the University.

      3. Faculty Syllabus Requirements

        1. Faculty will place in every course syllabus the following language:

        2. Southern Arkansas University affirms its commitment to academic integrity and expects all members of the University community to accept shared responsibility for maintaining academic integrity. Students in this course are subject to the provisions of the University’s Academic Integrity Policy, approved by the President and published in the Student Handbook. Penalties for academic misconduct in this course may include a failing grade on an assignment or a failing grade in the course. Continued enrollment in this course affirms a student’s acceptance of this University policy.

        3. An instructor may include in the course syllabus additional information about academic integrity if the instructor wishes to do so.

      4. Academic Misconduct File and Assistance with Notice to Students

        1. All documentation relevant to a student’s academic misconduct will be maintained in the Office of the Provost in a digital form. Academic misconduct files shall only be used in accordance with University FERPA policy.

        2. If the student makes a formal appeal, it will be decided in accordance with the procedures set forth below. If the matter is appealed to the Academic Integrity Council, the Provost (or designee) will forward all forms and other materials associated with the specific violation and a summary of other Academic Integrity violations committed by the student to the Chair of the Academic Integrity Council, to be disseminated to members of the Council.

        3. Students may not drop a class until the allegation of the academic integrity violation has been resolved. If the allegation is confirmed, the instructor retains the ability to assign a grade for the course, consistent with the criteria below, if the student decides to drop the class after completion of the process.

      5. Notification of Charge of Academic Misconduct to Student

        1. All forms used in the process will be located on SAU Academic Integrity web page and will be sent via SAU email. All forms will be copied to the instructor and to the student to keep them informed of the process. A copy will be sent to the appropriate dean of the college in which the alleged misconduct occurred.

        2. When an instructor determines that a student has engaged in academic misconduct, the instructor may take one of two actions: 1) the instructor may complete the web-based academic integrity violation form; or 2) the instructor may choose to meet informally with the student to discuss the alleged academic misconduct and then decide, on the basis of that meeting, whether or not to complete and submit the web-based academic integrity violation form. The form is found on SAU’s Academic Integrity webpage. This form will notify the student, the dean, and the Provost of the allegation through the student’s SAU email account. The notice will include the justification for the allegation. Once the form has been received, the Office of the Provost will inform the dean as to whether the student has been found responsible for any previous violations of the Academic Integrity Policy and at what level.

        3. NOTE: Faculty members should not penalize a student for acts of academic misconduct unless an academic integrity violation form has been completed and the process described in this section has been followed. To do otherwise would deprive students of their due process right to appeal any actions taken against them.

      6. Meeting with the Dean

        1. The student will have three days (excluding weekends and holidays) to make contact with the appropriate academic dean and schedule a meeting. (Should the student fail to make contact with the dean within the prescribed time, the dean’s decision as to violation level and sanction will be final.)  Once contacted, the dean should ensure that the meeting takes place within seven (7) calendar days of the student’s receipt of the initial notification email. If the dean is unable to schedule a meeting within seven days, the dean may ask an assistant dean, an associate dean, or the Provost to serve in his or her place. At the meeting, the dean will inform the student of the violation level associated with the alleged academic misconduct and provide the student with a copy of the entire Academic Integrity Policy, pointing out the relevant sanctions. The dean will then inform the student that the student has seven (7) calendar days to submit an appeal. If the student does not submit an appeal within seven calendar days, the dean’s decision as to violation level and sanction will be final. At the end of the meeting, the dean must fill out (within 24 hours) the associated form including the sanction value of the violation. This form should be sent to the student, the instructor, and the Provost.

      7. Appeals Process

        1. A student may appeal the charge of academic misconduct and/or the proposed violation level through the procedures set forth below.

          1. Appeals at the College Level

            1. Within seven (7) calendar days of receipt of the appeal, the dean will review all materials submitted by the student and Provost and, if necessary, meet with the student to attempt to resolve the matter. Online students may speak with the dean via electronic telecommunications. After the meeting with the student, the dean will render a decision on the appeal and fill out the online form within 24 hours. The instructor, student, and Office of the Provost will be informed of the dean’s decision.

            2. If the student is not satisfied with the action of the dean, the student can appeal the decision of the dean to the University Academic Integrity Council.

            3. If the instructor is not satisfied with the action of the dean, the faculty member may also appeal the decision to the University Academic Integrity Council.

          2. Appeals to the University Academic Integrity Council

            1. Within seven (7) calendar days of receipt of the notice of the college/dean appeal decision, the student or instructor may appeal to the Academic Integrity Council. The party filing the appeal will use the appropriate form found on SAU’s Academic Integrity Council web page. Upon receiving this form, the Provost will forward all forms and other materials associated with the specific count and a summary of other Academic Integrity violations committed by the student to the Chair of the Academic Integrity Council and that material will be disseminated to all members of the Council.

            2. Within seven (7) calendar days of receipt of the appeal, the Academic Integrity Council will consider the appeal with at least three members of the Council being present. The decision of the Academic Integrity Council will be forwarded (within 24 hours) to the student, the instructor, the dean, the Registrar, and the Provost via the web-based form.

            3. The Provost will review all decisions recommending suspension or expulsion.

          3. Final Notification to Student and Instructor

            1. Once the process is complete, the student, the instructor, the dean, the Chair of the Academic Integrity Council, and the Registrar will receive information from the Provost of the final disposition of the case, including the violation level and sanction points if the student is guilty.

      8. Violation Levels

        1. The following violation levels are assigned to specific types of violations of the University’s Academic Integrity Policy; if a violation occurs that is not specifically provided below, then any sanctions will be based on the most similar type of violation that exists in the rubric. A violation will be considered as a single violation up until the point that a student receives notice of that violation; additional infractions occurring after that point will be considered separately for purposes of this rubric. If assignment of a sanction requires the Academic Integrity Council to interpret the sanction rubric, the Academic Integrity Council shall provide a rationale for its determination and application of the particular sanction(s). General guidance on substantial issues of interpretation of the sanction rubric shall be provided by the Provost.

        2. A student receives the assigned number of sanction points for each violation for which the student is found responsible. Sanction points are cumulative over the length of the student’s matriculation at Southern Arkansas University. Graduate students will be considered new matriculates.

        3. The violation levels are as follows:

          1. Level Zero Violation – 0 sanction points

            1. For plagiarism/copying in work done for a course, if the plagiarized/copied material constitutes less than 10% of the assignment (first offense only).

            2. Unauthorized collaboration on homework assignments constituting less than 10% of the assignment in the judgment of the dean (first offense only).

            3. Use of any materials or resources that are not authorized by the instructor in completing any assignment having a value of less than 10% of the assignment in the judgment of the dean (first offense only).

          2. Level One Violation1.0 sanction points for each violation

            1. Copying from or viewing another student’s work during an examination.

            2. Using any materials or resources that are not authorized by the instructor for use during an examination or in completing any assignment having a value equal to or greater than 10% of the assignment in the judgment of the dean, or a second offense.

            3. Collaborating during an examination with any other person by giving or receiving information without specific permission of the instructor.

            4. Facilitating or aiding in any act of academic dishonesty.

            5. Collaborating on laboratory work, or other assigned work when instructed to work independently.

            6. Submitting, without specific permission of the instructor, work that has been previously offered by the same student for credit in another course.

            7. Falsification of attendance and/or participation.

            8. Submitting as one’s own any theme, report, term paper, essay, computer program, speech, painting, drawing, sculpture, or other written or creative work or project of any nature prepared totally or in large measure by another/plagiarizing, in work completed for a class assignment, when that copying/plagiarizing constitutes less than 10% of the assignment in the judgment of the dean and is a second offense, or when that copying/plagiarizing constitutes 10% or more of the assignment in the judgment of the dean.

            9. Unauthorized collaboration on homework assignments constituting 10% in the judgment of the dean or more of the assignment, or less than 10% of the assignment in the judgment of the dean on a second offense.

          3. Level Two Violation – 2.0 sanction points for each violation

            1. Submitting as one’s own any work prepared totally or in large measure by another.

            2. Uploading of quizzes, examinations or any other graded materials, with or without answers, to a third-party website.

            3. Submitting altered or falsified data (in work completed for a class assignment).

          4. Level Three Violation – 4.0 sanction points for each violation

            1. Altering grades or official records.

            2. Falsifying or signing another person’s name on any academically-related University form or document.

            3. Buying or selling course work (paying another person to complete exams, assignments, etc. or being paid to do this for another).

            4. Sabotaging another student’s work.

            5. Note: For offenses not specifically mentioned in this rubric, faculty members may confer with the Academic Integrity Council Chair and propose a description of the offense and the level of sanction to be recommended in the faculty member’s syllabus. The proposed description and sanctions will be forwarded to the Academic Integrity Council Chair to review the proposed offense and sanction for consistency with existing offenses and sanctions. If a faculty member and Academic Integrity Chair disagree over a particular offense or sanction, the matter may be discussed with the relevant dean and/or the Academic Integrity Council.

      9. Sanctions: The possible university sanctions are as follows:

        1. Sanction points for Level 0 = 0.0 The student will be issued a Letter of Reprimand (first offense only). There will be no grade sanction for a Level Zero offense. Student must attend the Academic Integrity Course.

        2. Sanction points for Level 1= 1.0 For work for a course, the instructor will give the test or an assignment an immediate zero (0) which will then be averaged into the course grade. If that involves missing a stated deadline, the stated late penalty will apply. Student must take the Academic Integrity Course.

        3. Sanction points for Level 2= 2.0 The student will receive a course grade of XF for work done for a course. A 2.0 offense will result in academic integrity suspension for one semester.

        4. Sanction points for Level 3= 4.0 or more The student will be immediately and permanently expelled. An XF will be given for the course(s).

      10. Opportunity and Removal for the “X”

        1. After two semesters of acceptable performance at the University following the imposition of a penalty, with no student conduct or academic dishonesty infractions, the student may request grade forgiveness by the Provost.

        2. To remove the X on the transcript, the student may request that the X be removed by submitting a written petition to the Provost. This written petition must provide evidence that the student now understands ethical standards (e.g., GPA following the infraction; lack of subsequent infractions [academic and conduct]; proactive activities that the student has engaged in to learn about appropriate techniques for citation, etc.). The X will still be counted if future infractions occur.

      11. Degrees, Honors, and Awards

        1. The University reserves the right to withhold or withdraw degrees, honors, or awards due to violations of the Academic Integrity Policy.

      12. Suspension and Expulsion

        1. Suspension involves withdrawal of enrollment privileges for a specified period of time and ordinarily carries with it conditions that must be met for re-enrollment. Suspended students are not permitted to live or board in University facilities or approved student organization housing (i.e., facilities owned by the University and leased to a student organization). Students who are suspended may not receive credit for University work completed by correspondence or in residence at another university without prior permission from the Provost or designee. Records of suspension are maintained indefinitely.

        2. Expulsion is a permanent dismissal from the University. These records are maintained indefinitely. Expulsion from Southern Arkansas University for academic dishonesty will be permanently noted on the student’s transcript.

        3. Note: The Academic Integrity Policy of the University of Arkansas was a source for the update of this policy.

  4. Grade Records

    1. Grade books may be obtained from the faculty member’s department chair or college dean. Upon leaving the University faculty, the faculty member is responsible for leaving all grade records with the college dean.

  5. Other Policies

    1. Advising

      1. Academic advising is an important part of a faculty member’s workload. Faculty members may be given specific advising assignments each year, depending on the needs of the department and the college. Southern Arkansas University recognizes that advising is a service responsibility of the faculty.

      2. Freshman students are normally advised through the Academic Advising and Assistance Center during their first year. Academic departments may assist these students if they are declared majors or if students seek departmental assistance. Students who have selected a major in which the curriculum has heavy prerequisites will be urged to seek departmental guidance.

    2. Textbooks

        1. Requisition by Faculty

          1. The management of the campus bookstore will send a textbook order form to the faculty at least two weeks prior to the October 15 and March 15 deadlines for book order submissions to ensure compliance with state statutes. The form determines 1) what textbooks each instructor will require the succeeding semester, 2) the approximate number of each text that will be needed, and 3) whether the books used during the current semester will be used the next time the course is offered. Textbook requisitions must be approved by the department chair, and one copy of all requisitions must be forwarded to the appropriate dean(s). A faculty member may borrow textbooks from the bookstore for a period of not more than 90 days. If not returned in good condition during the above period, the books will be charged to the teacher’s departmental budget.

        2. Student Responsibility

          1. Students are expected to acquire all textbooks assigned in courses in which they enroll.

    3. Faculty Attendance at Spring Commencement

      1. The deans and chairs are to develop a rotation of required attendance that will ensure sufficient faculty presence at each of the spring ceremonies. Faculty members who elect to attend the graduate ceremony are not expected to attend an undergraduate ceremony. Individual Faculty members who wish to participate in commencement ceremonies more often than expected may choose to do so. The Registrar will be provided a list of participants for the ordering of academic regalia for the faculty.

    4. Library

      1. Policies and information related to the functions and services of the Magale Library may be found in the University Handbook.

  6. Intellectual Property Policy

    1. The primary purpose of the Intellectual Property Policy is to provide the necessary protections and incentives to encourage both the discovery and development of new knowledge and its transfer for the public benefit; a secondary purpose is to enhance the generation of revenue for the home institutions and the creators.

    2. Definitions

      1. Although the law provides for several different types of Intellectual Property, SAU faculty concerns center around two: copyrightable and patentable properties. The following definitions are adapted from the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) document “Sample Intellectual Property & Policy Contract Language,” which relies on pertinent federal statutes:

      2. The term “Copyrightable” shall be understood to mean that bundle of rights that protect original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device. “Works of authorship” (including computer programs) include, but are not limited to, the following: literary works; musical works, including any accompanying words; dramatic works, including any accompanying music, pantomimes, and choreographic works; pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works (photographs, prints, diagrams, models, and technical drawings); motion pictures and other audiovisual works; sound recordings; and architectural works. “Tangible media” include, but are not limited to, books, periodicals, manuscripts, phonograph records, films, tapes, and disks. “Tangible media” also include material created for ordinary teaching use (including, but not limited to, traditional, distance, and online course delivery methods) and in departmental programs, such as course content/materials, syllabi, assignments, tests, activities, and exercises.

      3. The term “Patentable” shall be understood to mean that bundle of rights that protects inventions or discoveries which constitute any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof.

      4. “Directed work” or “work for hire” is defined as a work agreed upon between the University faculty creator(s), the creation of which is based upon a specific request by the University and which requires substantial University resources. To qualify as a “directed work” or a “work for hire,” the following three conditions must be satisfied:

        1. A specific request by the University;

        2. Substantial resources invested by the University; and
        3. Agreement between the University and the faculty creator. Such arrangement is to be agreed to in writing in advance, and in full conformance with other provisions of this agreement.
      5. Substantial resources will vary by department and context. To be “substantial,” the resources must be beyond the ordinary (e.g., computer or Blackboard or equivalent) and must be more than that to which other members of the department or unit are regularly offered as support for their work. For example, if a unit moves all courses online, support to move these courses online would not, in this context, be substantial as support was not differentially provided.
    3. Ownership of Copyright or Patent:
      1. Intellectual property created, made, or originated by a faculty member shall be the sole and exclusive property of the faculty, author, or inventor, except as the faculty member may voluntarily choose to transfer such property, in full, or in part, except when the work qualifies as a “directed work” or “work for hire” by meeting the three criteria stated in the definition of such work, found above.
    4. Ownership of Copyright of Course Materials:
      1. Material created for ordinary teaching use in the classroom or for distance or online courses or programs, such as course content/materials, syllabi, assignments, tests, activities, and exercises, shall remain the property of the faculty author, but institutions shall be permitted to use such material for internal instructional, educational, and administrative purposes, including satisfying requests of accreditation agencies for faculty-authored syllabi and course descriptions.
    5. Frequently Asked Questions:
      1. Do I own copyright in my course?
        1. To be copyrightable, a work must be “fixed in tangible form” – that is, it cannot be oral. Thus, “courses” are not copyrightable as a general matter. Course materials (syllabus, class notes, etc.) of sufficient originality can be copyrightable and as academic works, copyright in such materials belongs to the faculty member.
      2. For the University to own a directed work, must the agreement be in writing?
        1. No. However, administrators and faculty are encouraged to memorialize agreements in writing.
      3. What are “substantial resources” under this policy?
        1. The substantial resources threshold will vary by college, department, unit, and context. At the broad policy level, it would be unwise to try to capture such a variety of potential situations. However, resources beyond the normal provision made to faculty members are, at a minimum, a threshold factor in this determination. Remember also that the other two criteria (request and agreement by the faculty member) must be satisfied for a work to qualify as “directed” under this policy.
  7. Copyright Policy

    1. Significant portions of this policy are derived from Complete Copyright: An Everyday Guide for Librarians, by Carrie Russell, Creative Deed License 2004, American Library Association. This use is subject to the following: original credit to the author, non-commercial use, and sharing based on these same conditions.
      1. Copyright Basics
        1. The founding fathers believed that authors and inventors would be more likely to create new works if they were given an incentive. Congress established a set of exclusive rights that gave copyright holders the sole right to reproduce and market their works to the public for “limited times.” During the term of copyright, copyright holders would have no competitors in the market for their particular copyrighted works. Initially, the exclusive rights pertained only to the rights of reproduction and distribution, but over the years, Congress has created additional rights. Copyright law is found in Title 17 of the United States Code.
        2. The owner of copyright, under this title, has exclusive rights to do and to authorize any of the following:
          1. to reproduce the copyrighted work in copies or phonograph records;
          2. to prepare derivative works based upon the copyrighted work;
          3. to distribute copies of phonograph records of the copyrighted work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending;
          4. in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, choreographic works, pantomimes, motion pictures, and other audiovisual works, to perform the copyrighted work publicly;
          5. in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, choreographic works, pantomimes, pictorial, graphic, or sculptural works, including the individual images of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, to display the copyrighted work publicly; and
          6. in the case of sound recordings, to perform the copyrighted work publicly by means of a digital audio transmission.
        3. If a person other than the copyright holder uses one of the exclusive rights without the authorization of the copyright holder, that person has infringed copyright (unless an exemption applies).
        4. Once an expression is fixed in a tangible medium, it is afforded copyright protection immediately. A doodle made during a staff meeting, a webpage published on the World Wide Web, and the video one makes of a friend’s wedding are all equally copyrighted. In the past, to gain copyright protection for a work, the work had to be registered with the U.S. Copyright Office and/or contain a copyright notice (© 1999 Joe Creative) on the published work. The Berne Convention Implementation Act of 1988 (which went into effect on March 1, 1989) amended the Copyright Act of 1976 by eliminating the registration and notice requirement.
        5. Since copyright is automatic, copyright is the rule rather than the exception. The creator or author must do something in order not to have copyright protection. She or he can put notice on the work saying, “This material is not protected by copyright” or “I assert as the creator of this work that this work be recognized as public domain material.” If the creator does not take action to the contrary, all created works are automatically protected. Thus, materials are copyright protected, instantly.
      2. Duration of Copyright
        1. The copyright term has been extended many times throughout the history of copyright law, and the rules for copyright registration, renewal, and notice have also been amended numerous times. As a result, it can be very difficult to determine whether materials are protected by copyright. To complicate matters, additional modifications of the law have affected the term of unpublished materials.
      3. Exceptions to Copyright Protection
        1. Non-copyrightable work
          1. Copyright does not protect ideas, but it does protect expression. The idea of a story – “boy meets girl” – cannot be protected by copyright, but a “boy meets girl” story expressed in an original way can be protected.
          2. Works that are obvious in their nature, such as the 12-month Julian calendar, cannot be protected by copyright. However, other parts of the calendar, such as original art or photography, may be protected by copyright.
          3. Copyright law does not protect facts, but it does protect the original and creative selection and arrangement of facts. For example, a bibliography is a list of citations that cannot be protected. An annotated bibliography is copyright protected (not the list of citations but the original and creative annotations). On the other hand, a nonannotated bibliography might arguably qualify for copyright protection based on the originality of the selection of citations. Likewise, a bibliography arranged in a novel and creative way might also qualify.
          4. Current copyright law protects only those elements of databases that contain originality and creatively in selection, coordination, or arrangement. Copyright protection for databases is often considered minimal, since databases frequently are composed almost entirely of public domain materials. These types of works of authorship are sometimes said to have “thin” copyright protection.
          5. Since existing copyright law protects an original selection, arrangement, and coordination of facts in databases, librarians and other public interest groups have argued that additional copyright protection is not necessary. If database producers could also copyright the facts that reside within a database, basic tenets of copyright law would be challenged:
            1. Originality is a constitutional requirement for copyright protection.
            2. Copyright only protects expression and not ideas.
            3. Copyright’s purpose to advance learning demands that ideas and information presented by others be built upon to create new works.
            4. Once materials fall into the public domain, they cannot be copyright protected.
        2. Public Domain
          1. The public domain is information, knowledge, discoveries, and artistic creation never or no longer protected by copyright. Most of us know that facts, for example, are automatically part of the public domain, because facts cannot be copyrighted. The copyright law (§ 102) goes on to say that “in no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery.” Thus, while a particular process a person may have designed for shelving books in his library cannot be protected by copyright, a description, explanation, or illustration of the process could be protected by copyright.
          2. In addition, works of the U.S. government produced by government employees are in the public domain. This category includes works that are created by all agencies of the federal government, such as the Internal Revenue Service, federal legislation, the president’s speeches, and court rulings. Works created by state governments and their employees may or may not be in the public domain.
          3. Once materials are in the public domain, anyone can exercise a right of copyright without the prior permission of the copyright holder. For example, publishing a work from the public domain is not violation of copyright. In fact, the re-publication of such a work can generate new revenue, not for the original copyright holder, but for whoever publishes and markets it.
        3. Fair Use
          1. Fair use is limited use without signing a license and without paying a fee. It not only allows but also encourages socially beneficial uses of copyrighted works such as teaching, learning, and scholarship. There is never an immediate answer to the question, “Is this a fair use?” One must make a fair use determination based on sound judgment and the careful consideration of the situation at hand and that determination may take some time. Those who prefer a “yes” or “no” answer may be troubled by the ambiguous nature of fair use, but fair use cannot be reduced to a checklist. Fair use requires people to think.
          2. But at least the fair use section of the copyright law is short and easy to read:
          3. Sec.107. Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonograph records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is fair use, the factors to be considered shall be
            1. the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes;
            2. the nature of the copyrighted work;
            3. the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and
            4. the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.
          4. The Supreme Court has framed the larger policy issue by saying that “to negate fair use one need only show that if the challenged use should become widespread, it would adversely affect the potential market for the copyrighted work.” Usually, one will need to investigate a few facts to assess the “market” and “effect” on the copyrighted work for a particular use. A person considering the issue of fair use might ask questions such as these:
            • What is the market and “potential” market?
            • Has a market developed at all?
            • What is its rough size – a handful of possible buyers for some precisely focused newsletters, or a wealth of takers for a Hollywood film?
          5. Making a copyrighted work available to a small group of enrolled students for the purpose of teaching, learning, and scholarship is likely an easier fair use case than sharing that work with six billion people worldwide on a publicly accessible website. Ease and cost of acquiring permission also is a question to ponder and address in assessing the potential market.
        4. The TEACH Act
          1. Before the TEACH Act was passed in 2002, section 110 did not address transmitting digital materials to students in distance education situations. Unlike fair use, the TEACH amendment is more of a checklist – one is allowed to do this and that, but you have to follow these particular conditions. The TEACH Act allows copyrighted works in digital formats to be digitally transmitted to students in the classroom or in distance learning environments without prior permission from the copyright holder. But make no mistake: the exemptions addressing the use of digital materials in the classroom are limited in scope. In particular, educational institutions must meet specific requirements before the exemption can be used.
        5. Public Displays and Performances in the Classroom
          1. In the face-to-face teaching situation (physical classroom or other place devoted to instruction), instructors and pupils at non-profit educational institutions may display analog works protected by copyright holder. For audiovisual works, like videotapes, the copy used must be a lawful copy. But, as you know by now, copyright has to be confusing most of the time. When transmitting material via digital networks, the rules for the display and performance of copyrighted works to the classroom are more complex and detailed in nature.
      4. Additional Rules for Digital Works and Digital Transmission of Works Protected by Copyright
        1. All materials used for display and performance in the classroom must be works that were lawfully made and acquired, or at least one should have every reason to believe that the copies are lawful copies.
        2. Teaching must occur at an accredited, non-profit educational institution. Accreditation for K-12 schools is recognition by the applicable state certification or licensing board. For higher education, the college or university must be approved by a regional or national accrediting agency recognized by the Council on Higher Education and Accreditation or the U.S. Department of Education.
        3. The use of the copyrighted resources must be within the confines of “mediated instructional activities” – integral to the course, under the direction of the course instructor, and analogous to the kinds of performances or displays one would expect in a physical classroom.
        4. The use of dramatic literary works – those works with a dramatic element like an opera or play – and any other work (including audiovisual works) is limited to smaller, discrete portions of the work unless performing or displaying the entire work is essential to the course. For example, an instructor teaching the course “Films of John Ford” probably needs to show one or more John Ford Films in their entirety to meet course goals. In the rare instance where it is necessary to transmit a digital copy of a film via a computer network to students in remote locations, TEACH could also apply, but only if the digital copy is necessary to meet pedagogical goals. The digital transmission is made for enrolled students only and to the extent technologically feasible, limited to enroll students.
        5. To use these exemptions, educational institutions must also have in place copyright policies and copyright educational resources that promote lawful use of copyrighted works and that are readily available to instructors, staff, and students. In addition, students should be alerted to the fact that copyrighted works used in courses may be protected by copyright. Labeling works as protected by copyright and including the notice of copyright whenever possible is more important when works are in digital formats. Furthermore, the educational institution that transmits digital works must use technological protection measure (passwords, watermarking, and encryption) that reasonably prevent:
          1. retention of the work in accessible form for any time longer than the class session.
          2. unauthorized further dissemination of the work to others.
          3. activities that would decrypt or otherwise interfere with technological measures already employed by the copyright holder to prevent retention or unauthorized distribution of the work.
        6. Digital materials are more vulnerable to copyright infringement because of the ease of reproduction and broad distribution. With TEACH, Congress said digital works should be more tightly controlled. To achieve this end, educational institutions are required to make a concerted effort to prevent infringements in two ways – by educating the educational community about copyright law and by using technology to limit the possibility of infringement.
      5. Effectiveness of Technological Controls Required by TEACH
        1. Arguably, the most difficult aspect of interpreting the TEACH Act is the technological requirements expected of institutions who want to exercise the TEACH exemptions. Congress used the “reasonable measures” language as an acknowledgement that educators’ judgment and our demonstration of good faith will come into play when educators implement protection technologies. The institution should take reasonable measures to protect copyrighted works as best as possible, given existing technology, its availability, and the technological capabilities of the individual school, college, or university.
        2. Fair use is always an alternative option for educational institutions. Teachers and students can use digital materials for teaching if the use is a fair use. In fact, before the TEACH amendment, many educational institutions exercised fair use when using digital materials for educational purposes. As far as can be determined, none of these actions led to litigation. If the use of digital material is fair, the institution is not infringing. Note that with fair use, the institution is not required by law to meet the technological requirements outlined in section 110.
      6. Course Packs
        1. Publishers and other copyright holders have long been concerned about course packs, for a number of reasons. If course packs are used rather than textbooks, profits are affected. Publishers and other copyright holders believe that they should be compensated – through permission fees, for example – for the use of copyrighted material in a course pack. Indeed, copyright permission fees are an increasing source of income for many publishers. Publishers are able to continue to collect royalties even on materials they no longer print or make available in the market.
        2. On the other hand, educators may feel that, if the materials are being used for non-profit, educational purposes, course packs are fair uses. After all, one of the exemplars of fair use listed in section 107 is “multiple copies for classroom use.” Even so, two court cases have found against course packs without copyright permissions.
        3. Unfortunately, the copyright law does not tell us when permission is necessary for the copyrighted works included in course packs. We know that if a copyright exemption such as fair use does not apply, permission should be sought. Some people assert that the “first use” of a copyrighted work in a course pack is fair, and subsequent uses of the same material are unfair. The copyright law does not provide a specific indication that repeated use of the same item is an infringement. However, if the repeated use is conducted to avoid a purchase, the fourth factor – effect on the market – would certainly come into play, and permission should be sought. For those institutions that rely on the Agreement on Guidelines for Classroom Copying in Not-for-Profit Educational Institutions, to make fair use decisions, repeated use may be in conflict with the “spontaneity” constraint. However, the Classroom Guidelines are merely one way to make decisions about copying. “True” fair use determinations (based on section 107) do not rely on the guidelines. Magale Library is the contact point for seeking permission for use when that need is determined. The Library currently is paying the copyright permission cost if it is not unreasonable.
      7. The TEACH Act and Reserves
        1. The legislative history for the TEACH Act makes clear that exemptions to public performance and public display of resources outlined in section 110 do not apply to reserves. This makes sense if one considers that rarely would an instructor publicly display a journal article for classroom purposes. Students do not read their materials during the class period. It is more likely that a portion of a resource (like a graph or illustrative model) may be displayed in the classroom. Public performance applies only to works that are publicly performed (recitation, theatrical production, choreography) or that are shown or heard by means of a playback device (videos, motion pictures, sound recordings). Public displays are for work “on display” as in works that would be displayed in an art gallery.
      8. Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) of 1998
        1. The DMCA is the principal amendment that attempts to update the copyright law for the digital environment. This law remains unsettled and controversial. The DMCA:
          1. provides some protection to online service providers from liability for online infringement if certain conditions are true and particular rules are followed;
          2. allows libraries and archives to make up three reproductions for replacement or preservation purposes under certain conditions;
          3. gives copyright holders the right to control or deny access to digital works protected by copyright;
          4. makes the circumvention of technology used to protect copyrighted materials a civil and criminal offense;
          5. prohibits the manufacture, provision, importation of, and trafficking of ant-circumvention and anti-copying devices or software;
          6. prohibits tampering with copyright management information;
          7. maintains that rights, remedies, limitations, or defenses to copyright infringement, including fair use, are not affected regardless of new prohibitions on anti-circumvention technologies (although fair use is not a defense to the criminal act of circumvention);
          8. establishes that an ongoing, administrative rule-making proceeding be held to evaluate the impact of the anti-circumvention provisions on non-infringing uses of copyrighted works;
          9. directs the U.S. Copyright Office and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration of the Department of Commerce (NTIA) to produce a joint report on first sale and computer software exemptions and how encryption research may be affected by DMCA; and
          10. directs the U.S. Copyright Office to hold public hearings and make recommendations regarding distance education.

Academic Freedom, Responsibility, and Tenure

The Academic Freedom, Responsibility, and Tenure policies of Southern Arkansas University have been in accordance with the principles enunciated by the AAUP in 1940 and refined and modified since that time.

  1. Academic Freedom

    1. The administration and faculty of Southern Arkansas University adhere to the generally accepted principle that institutions of higher education exist for the common good and not to further the interest of either the individual teacher or the institution as a whole. The common good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition.
    2. Institutions of higher education are committed to the solution of problems and controversies by the method of rational discussion. Acts of physical force or disruptive acts which interfere with University activities, freedom of movement on the campus, or freedom for students to pursue their studies are the antithesis of academic freedoms and responsibility, as are acts which, in effect, deny freedom of speech, freedom to be heard, and freedom to pursue research of their own choosing to members of the academic community or to invited visitors.
    3. Academic freedom entitles the teacher to full freedom in research and/or artistic expression and in the publication or presentation of the results. But research, publication, or presentation for pecuniary return should be based on an understanding with the authorities of the institution.
    4. Academic freedom is the freedom to discuss all relevant matters in the classroom; to explore all avenues of scholarship, research, and creative expression; and to speak or write without institutional discipline or restraint on matters of public concern, as well as, on matters related to professional duties and the functioning of the University. Academic responsibility implies the faithful performance of professional duties and obligations, the recognition of the demands of the scholarly enterprise, and the candor to make it clear that, when one is speaking on matters of public interest, one is not speaking for the institution.
  2. Academic Responsibility

    1. The concept of freedom should be accompanied by an equally demanding concept of responsibility. University teachers are citizens, members of a learned profession, and officers of an educational institution. When teachers speak or write as citizens, they should be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but their special position in the community imposes special obligations. As people of learning and educational officers, teachers should remember that the public may judge their profession and their institution by their utterances. Hence, teachers should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that they are not speaking for the institution.

    2. The following is taken from the Statement of Ethics prepared by the AAUP. It provides guidance on ethical standards appropriate for faculty:

    3. Introduction.   From its inception, the American Association of University Professors has recognized that membership in the academic profession carries with it special responsibilities. The Association has consistently affirmed these responsibilities in major policy statements, providing guidance to professors in such matters as their utterances as citizens, the exercise of their responsibilities to students and colleagues, and their conduct when resigning from an institution or when undertaking sponsored research. The Statement on Professional Ethics that follows sets forth those general standards that serve as a reminder of the variety of responsibilities assumed by all members of the profession.

    4. In the enforcement of ethical standards, the academic profession differs from those of law and medicine, whose associations act to ensure the integrity of members engaged in private practice. In the academic profession the individual institution of higher learning provides this assurance and so should normally handle questions concerning propriety of conduct within its own framework by reference to a faculty group. The Association supports such local action and stands ready, though the general secretary and the Committee on Professional Ethics, to counsel with members of the academic community concerning questions of professional ethics and to inquire into complaints when local consideration is impossible or inappropriate. If the alleged offense is deemed sufficiently serious to raise the possibility of adverse action, the procedures should be in accordance with the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, the 1958 Statement on Procedural Standards in Faculty Dismissal Proceedings, or the applicable provisions of the Association’s Recommended Institutional Regulations on Academic Freedom and Tenure.

    5. The Statement:

      1. Professors, guided by a deep conviction of the worth and dignity of the advancement of knowledge, recognize the special responsibilities placed upon them. Their primary responsibility to their subject is to seek and to state the truth as they see it. To this end professors devote their energies to developing and improving their scholarly competence. They accept the obligation to exercise critical self-discipline and judgment in using, extending, and transmitting knowledge. They practice intellectual honesty. Although professors may follow subsidiary interests, these interests must never seriously hamper or compromise their freedom of inquiry.

      2. As teachers, professors encourage the free pursuit of learning in their students. They hold before them the best scholarly and ethical standards of their discipline. Professors demonstrate respect for students as individuals and adhere to their proper roles as intellectual guides and counselors. Professors make every reasonable effort to foster honest academic conduct and to ensure that their evaluations of students reflect each student’s true merit. They respect the confidential nature of the relationship between professor and student. They avoid any exploitation, harassment, or discriminatory treatment of students. They acknowledge significant academic or scholarly assistance from them. They protect their academic freedom.

      3. As colleagues, professors have obligations that derive from common membership in the community of scholars. Professors do not discriminate against or harass colleagues. They respect and defend the free inquiry of associates, even when it leads to findings and conclusions that differ from their own. Professors acknowledge academic debt and strive to be objective in their professional judgment of colleagues. Professors accept their share of faculty responsibilities for the governance of their institution.

      4. As members of an academic institution, professors seek above all to be effective teachers and scholars. Although professors observe the stated regulations of the institution, provided the regulations do not contravene academic freedom, they maintain their right to criticize and seek revision. Professors give due regard to their paramount responsibilities within their institution in determining the amount and character of work done outside it. When considering the interruption or termination of their service, professors recognize the effect of their decision upon the program of the institution and give due notice of their institution.

      5. As members of their community, professors have the rights and obligations of other citizens. Professors measure the urgency of these obligations in the light of their responsibilities to their subject, to their students, to their profession, and to their institution. When they speak of act as private persons, they avoid creating the impression of speaking or acting for their college or university. As citizens engaged in a profession that depends upon freedom for its health and integrity, professors have a particular obligation to promote conditions of free inquiry and to further public understanding of academic freedom.

    6. Grievance Procedure.    A faculty member, staff member, or student, https://web.saumag.edu/students/complaint-process/,  who alleges that another faculty member has violated the Statement of Ethics may lodge a complaint with the chair of the Faculty Staff Appeals and Human Rights Committee. The complainant will set forth in writing what actions or matters are being grieved and the remedy sought, and shall provide supporting documentation for the grievance. The chair of the Faculty Staff Appeals and Human Rights Committee will review the complaint and attempt to mediate the issue raised in the complaint. The sub-committee will be guided by Section 602 of the University Handbook, Faculty or Staff Member with Grievance (nondiscrimination). For ethical complaints under this section the sub-committee would follow the procedure beginning 

    7. If the complainant is dissatisfied with the result of the mediation, the chair will convene the Faculty Sub-committee of Faculty Staff Appeals and Human Rights Committee to make findings and recommendations on the complaint. The sub-committee will conduct such review as it deems warranted. It will afford the faculty member making the complaint, and the faculty member or members whose actions are the object of the grievance, opportunity to present and respond. The committee will determine whether the grievance has merit. If the committee so finds, it will recommend appropriate remedies.

    8. The sub-committee will submit its report to the Provost. The Provost will review the report and issue a final decision on the grievance. This will constitute final disposition of the grievance. This is a change from the grievance procedure which goes to the President.

    9. Refer to 2.32 Student Complaint Policy in the Student Handbook.

  3. Academic Tenure

    1. The University follows a two-track plan regarding tenure. Upon initial appointment an employee enters a non-tenure or tenure track, and all contracts to faculty personnel are clearly identified in this regard. No less than 2/3 (66.7 percent) of teaching positions will be on the tenure track. Here, “teaching position” designates faculty at any rank above adjunct but below the level of dean and excludes athletic coaching positions. Furthermore, no changes in tenure or non-tenure shall be applied retroactively.

  4. Non-Tenure Track Faculty

    1. Certain full-time positions, which consist of less than 100% teaching responsibility, may be filled by an appointment on the non-tenure track plan. Additionally, certain full-time positions with 100% teaching responsibility, but which clearly are of a limited duration, may also be classified as non-tenure track.

    2. A non-tenure track employee may have his/her contract renewed annually and under certain conditions may be considered for transfer to a tenure track position. In such a transfer, years accumulated in a non-tenure track position will not apply toward tenure unless the experience gained is in the field (area) assigned as a tenured appointment. The maximum number of years to transfer is four (4).

  5. Tenure Track Faculty

    1. Tenure is a means to certain ends, specifically 1) freedom of teaching and research and of extramural activities and 2) a sufficient degree of economic security to make the profession attractive to qualified candidates. Freedom and economic security, hence tenure, are indispensable to the success of an institution in fulfilling its obligations to its students and to society.

    2. Tenure will be based upon merit as a teacher and scholar, rather than upon an arbitrary number of years at the institution. However, an adequate amount of time is necessary for a teacher to demonstrate competence and for the institution to evaluate it. The period for earning tenure will be stated in writing during contract negotiations and a copy will be retained by the University and the new faculty member.  Section IX of this Handbook contains guidelines regarding tenure and promotion.

  6. Tenured Faculty

    1. After the expiration of a probationary period and upon the awarding of tenure, full-time teachers or investigators should have permanent or continuous tenure, and their service should be terminated only for adequate cause, except in the case of voluntary retirement, or under extraordinary circumstances because of financial exigencies.

Evaluation of Faculty and Administrators 

Annual Review of Performance

  1.  1992 Institutional Plan

    1. The following is the procedure for conducting the administrative, peer, and student evaluations required of faculty by Act 244 of 1989. The procedure was developed by an ad hoc committee on Annual Review of Performance. Act 244 requires state colleges and universities to conduct an annual review of the performance of all full-time faculty. The Act states: “This review shall include assessment by peers, students, and administrators and shall be utilized to insure a consistently high level of performance and serve in conjunction with other appropriate information as a basis for decisions on promotion, salary increases, and job retention. This review shall not be used to demote a tenured faculty member to a non-tenured status.”
    2. The faculty recommend that cost of living raises take precedence over merit pay. The University’s initial contract with a faculty member sets a “contractual value” on the faculty member’s service that the University should try to maintain in relation to the cost of living until the terms of the contract are changed by negotiation.
    3. The faculty does not oppose appropriate salary “adjustments” when change of degree status, prior gender or racial discrimination, considerations of salary equity, or other weighty considerations can be documented. Moreover, if the budget for faculty salary exceeds stated or planned cost of living increases, the Senate would support using the excess for merit pay. If it falls below cost of living increases, the Senate feels a policy of merit pay will result in more mischief than good.
    4. Since the passage and application of Act 244, another legislative bill was passed, Act 1330 of 1997, which requires state-supported colleges and universities “to review faculty performance, including post-tenure review. The framework should be used to develop processes and procedures at each institution to ensure a consistently high level of performance of the faculty at Arkansas’s publicly supported institutions of higher learning. The effects of the review process of faculty performance should include rewarding productive faculty, redirecting faculty efforts to improve or to increase productivity, and to correct instances of substandard performance.”
  2. Faculty Evaluation

    1. Evaluation Materials Storage and Access
      1. All materials generated by peer, student, and administrative evaluations shall be secured in the Office of Human Resources. Summaries of peer and student evaluations shall be kept on file indefinitely. Access to the files will be limited to those who have a professional need to see them. Faculty shall have access to and may obtain copies of their own files.  Peer and administrative evaluations will be forwarded to HR either as hard or digital copies. Annual summaries of professional activity are processed through Mentor; HR will have access to Mentor files.
    2. General Procedures for Faculty Evaluation
      1. Specific dates each year will be provided by the Office of the Provost and VPAA.
        1. Preparation and Review of the Development Plan for Tenure-Track Faculty Members: By November 1 in the first year of appointment, new tenure-track faculty members and full-time instructors will meet with their chairs to prepare the initial Professional Development Plan, using the form entitled “Development Plan for __(Name)____. The plans will be forwarded to the dean and the Provost. By November 1 in subsequent years, the supervisor/department chair and the tenure-track faculty member or full-time instructor will meet to discuss progress made and update the development plan. The chair and the faculty member will date and initial the plan in the appropriate space. The plans with the chairs’ comments will be forwarded to the dean and Provost.
        2. Completion and Submission of Annual Summary of Professional Activity: By May 15, all full-time faculty members will submit the electronic version of their “Annual Summary of Professional Activity” to their supervisor (department chair, etc.), college dean (or equivalent), and the Office of Human Resources. This report provides self-evaluation data which may enhance a faulty member’s evaluation for the purposes of promotion, tenure, position retention, and/or salary increases.
        3. Chair’s Evaluation Scored on the Faculty Evaluation and Progress Review Form: By November 1, the department chair will evaluate each full-time faculty member for the previous academic year on the Faculty Evaluation and Progress Review form, hereafter referred to as the FEPR form. The progress report may occur at the same time as the overall chair evaluation of the faculty member. At the evaluation meeting between the department chair and faculty member, the two will also determine the “Faculty Member’s Preference Ranking of Evaluation Categories” for the upcoming evaluation cycle on the Faculty Evaluation and Progress Review Form.
          1. Data for consideration include the student evaluations, student comments, faculty self-evaluation through the “Annual Summary of Professional Activities,” faculty load, and professional contribution to departmental operations.
          2. Additional data may be collected for evaluation and documentation. Supervisors may solicit evaluative comments concerning external contractually assigned activities of faculty.
          3. At the evaluation meeting, the following details will be completed:
            1. the faculty member writes comments on the form, if so desired; and
            2. the faculty member signs and dates the form (by signing the form, the individual indicates only that the faculty member has read the form).
        4. Faculty Response to Evaluation Results
          1. If a faculty member wishes to respond to the evaluation results of a supervisor, the faculty member may, within one week of receiving the annual evaluation report, write a letter to the supervisor, explaining the problem. The supervisor will strive to solve the problem, which could include a re-evaluation, as soon as possible.
          2. A faculty member may request an evaluation by a supervisor at the level above that from which the faculty member is normally evaluated. Requests for reevaluation or further evaluation may continue to the level of the Provost.
          3. The FEPR form shall be sent to the dean for review and will be sent or made available to the faculty member after the dean’s comments have been recorded. The FEPR form shall then be sent the Office of Human Resources.
    3. Peer Evaluation Procedures
      1. *Members of each college have created their own Peer Evaluation Form.
        1. A peer, for evaluation purposes, shall
          1. be a full-time faculty member with at least a six-semester credit hour teaching load or its equivalent per semester;
          2. have been employed as a full-time faculty member at SAU for more than one year;
          3. be a member of the same department (Note: Faculty holding dual appointments, excluding instructors in the Methods and Materials courses in Education, shall evaluate and be evaluated in both departments.); and
          4. not include department chairs or deans.
        2. A department, for evaluation purposes, shall be defined by the administration.
        3. A peer review shall include the following:
          1. Face-to-Face and Online Course Evaluation Procedures:
            1. Peer assignment: The chair will assign the peer to observe a faculty member’s class. The faculty member, in consultation with the peer, will choose the class to be visited or observed. Consideration must be given to both face-to-face and online courses. Two faculty peers should not evaluate each other’s courses within the same academic year.
            2. Pre-Evaluation Communication: The peer reviewer will communicate with the instructor before the course evaluation. During the meeting the two will review the material to be presented and the connection to the syllabus, the planned instructional methods, the academic backgrounds and interests of the students, and the teaching style of the instructor.
            3. Classroom Observation (in the case of face-to-face courses): The peer reviewer will be present at the beginning of the class and remain throughout the session. The peer reviewer will record observations on a form developed by the appropriate college or department.
            4. Post-Observation Feedback: the peer reviewer will share initial observations and evaluations with the instructor following the course observation. The instructor will have the opportunity to respond to the peer reviewer’s observations in writing.
            5. The peer evaluation will occur at least once each academic year for tenure-track and tenured faculty. Non-tenure track faculty will have a course observation each year, while adjuncts will be observed at the discretion of the department chair.
            6. Academic departments and colleges may determine whether additional course observations are needed to strengthen faculty evaluation and development as well as to meet program accreditation standards. Individual faculty may request additional course observations.
            7. Tenured faculty members seeking a promotion must undergo a course observation, according to the rules above during the semester prior to submitting their promotion portfolio.
    4. Evaluation of the Annual Summary of Professional Activity:
      1. By October 1, a faculty member’s Annual Summary of Professional Activity Summary will be evaluated by at least one peer and an evaluation of the Summary submitted to the chair of the faculty member’s department. The chair will assign the peer(s) to evaluate a faculty member’s Annual Summary. The peer reviewer(s) will report their evaluations on a form developed by the college. Two faculty peers should not evaluate one another’s Annual Summary.
    5. Final Peer Review Evaluation:
      1. The evaluation will include the peer reviewer’s course observation form, the faculty member’s response to the classroom visit report, and an evaluation by the peer reviewer(s) of the faculty member’s Annual Summary of Professional Activity. This peer evaluation assessment will become part of the chair’s Faculty Evaluation and Progress Review that will be filed with the Provost and the Office of Human Resources. As set out in the Administrative Evaluation Procedures section, the faculty member will have the opportunity to respond to the FEPR findings, including the peer review evaluations.
  3. Student Evaluation Procedures

    1. New faculty will be evaluated by students in each course during their first three years of employment. Beginning with the fourth year of employment, the faculty member will be evaluated at the same rate as other faculty.
    2. Faculty in their fourth year of employment or beyond will be evaluated at least once in every course taught over a three-year period. These faculty must also be evaluated in a minimum of two courses per year. The cycle of courses to be evaluated during the three-year period will be agreed upon by the individual faculty member and appropriate departmental chair(s).
    3. Faculty members or their immediate supervisors may request and be granted a student evaluation during any semester. The Student Survey Form will be used as the instrument for faculty evaluations.
  4. Institutional Monitoring of the Annual Faculty Performance Review

    1. The Southern Arkansas University institutional plan will be monitored by a nine (9) member committee. The monitoring committee will be composed of four members of the faculty (one elected member from each of the four colleges) and the Deans’ Council (the deans of each college and the Provost). If no Faculty Senator is selected in this process to this committee, one will be appointed by the Faculty Senate president to serve as an ex officio member. The committee will meet following receiving written request(s) for re-evaluation of the annual faculty performance review process, as well as meeting each academic year to review the overall SAU institutional plan to ascertain its academic effectiveness and to ensure that the process is rigorously and consistently applied. The Office of Human Resources will be responsible for maintaining the University’s permanent faculty performance review records and in preparing the summary of the student’s evaluations and comments for all faculty participants.
  5. Institutional Evaluation of the Annual Faculty Performance Review System

    1. Based upon input from faculty to their college dean and/or the Faculty Senate, the AFPR Monitoring Committee members will regularly reevaluate the AFPR System to recommend any changes/modifications to the approved AFPR System, as necessary. Any proposed change to the AFPR system must be forwarded to the Faculty Senate for consideration.
  6. General Procedures for Administrator Evaluation

    1. Administrator Rating
      1. The administrators to be rated include chairs, deans, the Provost, and the President.
    2. Administrator Rating Process
      1. Administrators will be rated by the faculty in the academic unit that they administer, i.e., chairs by their departments, deans by their colleges, and the Provost and the President by all of the faculty.
      2. All administrators will be rated in their first year and on the two-year cycle for their unit thereafter.
      3. The faculty rating of an administrator is intended for the use of the administrator being rated.
      4. The Office of Human Resources will manage the process of conducting faculty ratings of administrators and will communicate a summary of these ratings to the evaluated administrator as soon as possible.
      5. The rating summaries will consist of averages of both the importance rating and the performance rating for each item, as well as a typed list of comments by category.
      6. In order to preserve the confidentiality of these ratings, the Office of Human Resources will destroy the original documentation of the faculty ratings for each administrator as soon as feasible. No permanent record will be maintained in the Office of Human Resources of said ratings.
      7. Additions and Exceptions to the above for Chair Evaluation:
        1. Chair ratings will be conducted only for those chairs that administer departments of five or more faculty.
        2. All chairs will continue to be rated by their departments as peers.
    3. Administrator Rating Forms: Administrator Rating Forms

Faculty Appointment, Tenure, and Promotion Guidelines

  1. Faculty Appointment Policies

    1. Faculty Hiring Procedures
      1. Southern Arkansas University adheres to Higher Learning Commission guidelines on “Determining Quality Faculty.” These guidelines state that “qualified faculty members are identified primarily by credentials, but other factors, including but not limited to equivalent experience, may be considered by the institution in determining whether a faculty member is qualified.”
      2. When a mutual agreement between the administration and the dean of a college indicates a faculty position opening, the following procedures are used: A personnel requisition form is to be completed by the supervisor and signed by the appropriate dean, the Provost, and the President. Upon receipt of the approved personnel requisition form in the Office of Human Resources, a representative from the Office of Human Resources will meet with the person(s) primarily responsible for the employment decision in order to explain the University’s employment procedures and to discuss other considerations regarding the position opening. The Office of Human Resources will advertise the position internally and externally and conduct standard correspondence with applicants.
      3. The person or persons responsible for the hiring recommendation as designated by the administration have the responsibility of screening and interviewing applicants and recommending to the Provost the candidate to fill the position. If interviews are required, the administration will establish an appropriate number of interviews (generally at least three for faculty positions and five for dean and vice president positions). The University will pay the costs of one visit to campus for the selected applicants. The formal written contract will be offered by the President or designee. Upon signing a contract, the candidate becomes a member of the faculty. See Section XI for search policies.
      4. Beginning at the time of employment and continuing throughout the term of employment, a set of basic records is maintained in the Office of Human Resources on the employee.
    2. Academic Rank Structure
      1. Academic personnel are classified in five categories: Distinguished Professor, Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, and Instructor.
      2. Academic personnel are defined here to include all members of the staff who teach either on a full-time or part-time basis. Academic personnel include both tenure-track and non-tenure-track appointments, except as noted in the following paragraph. Those who teach but whose duties are primarily administrative hold one of the above ranks, but in all official publications of the University, they are referred to by their administrative title only.
      3. Temporary, less-than-full-time teachers are designated as adjunct professors or adjunct instructors. Adjunct professors and adjunct instructors hold non-tenure-track appointments and are not covered by the tenure and promotion guidelines.
        1. Criteria for Initial Academic Rank Appointment. The following criteria identify the minimum qualifications for academic ranks at the time of initial appointment. All references to academic credentials include only accepted degrees and hours of graduate study related to the primary teaching field. All references to professional experience include service at this or some other institution of higher education and other appropriate experience related to the primary teaching field. (For purposes of determining time in rank for subsequent promotions, credit for prior professional experience is negotiated at the time of initial appointment and is limited to a maximum of two years.)
        2. Minimum Qualifications for Academic Ranks
          1. Distinguished Professor
            1. Academic credentials in the discipline:
            2. an earned doctorate, comparable terminal degree, or equivalent scholarly achievement (Ph.D., Ed.D., D.B.A., D.A., J.D., L.L.D., M.F.A., etc.)
            3. national recognition as a scholar and teacher based upon research, teaching, and/or scholarly pursuits at this or some other institution
          2. Professor
            1. Academic credentials in the discipline and professional experience:
            2. an earned doctorate, or comparable terminal degree, with a minimum of nine years of professional service, and
            3. demonstrated effectiveness as a teacher on the college level, and
            4. demonstrated scholarly activity, and
            5. demonstrated professional service.
          3. Associate Professor
            1. Academic credentials in the discipline and professional experience:
            2. an earned doctorate, or comparable terminal degree, with a minimum of four years of professional service, or
            3. ABD with commitment to complete the doctorate with a minimum of six years of professional service, or
            4. a master’s degree plus 60 hours in field with a minimum of six years of professional service, or
            5. a master’s degree plus 45 hours in field with a minimum of eight years of professional service, or
            6. a master’s degree plus 30 hours in field with a minimum of ten years of professional service, and
            7. demonstrated effectiveness as a teacher on the college level, and
            8. demonstrated scholarly activity, and
            9. demonstrated professional service.
          4. Assistant Professor
            1. Academic credentials in the discipline and professional experience:
            2. an earned doctorate, comparable terminal degree, or ABD with commitment to complete the doctorate, or
            3. a master’s degree plus 12 hours in field with a minimum of three years of professional service, or
            4. a master of science in nursing with a minimum of three years of professional experience.
          5. Instructor
            1. Academic credentials in the discipline:
            2. Faculty should possess a master’s degree and have completed at least 18 graduate hours in the discipline or subfield of the undergraduate credit courses for which they are the instructor of record and a terminal degree in the discipline if teaching graduate courses, or
            3. Academic colleges may choose to assign faculty to teach courses or to employ faculty to positions based upon their equivalent experience rather than by their formal credentials. The deans of the colleges must follow HLC and University guidelines in documenting that these faculty have “tested experience” that may include defined skills relevant to the courses, a record of accomplishment throughout their career and profession, and credentials or certifications that confirm expertise in the field. A documentation letter of tested experience from the appropriate dean and approved by the Provost must be included in the personnel files of the faculty employed under these criteria, or
            4. A bachelor of science in nursing may be appropriate for some courses.
        3. The above criteria are minimum qualifications for each academic rank. They are not intended to suggest that faculty members be assigned to the highest category for which they are technically qualified. The total evaluation of faculty members is a process that requires the exercise of judgment. Decisions as to the initial rank assigned to individual faculty members are rightfully an administrative function. Such decisions should be based on careful consideration of the above criteria; of the individual’s academic credentials, experience, teaching competence, and scholarship; and of supply and demand in the field, usefulness to the institution, and other factors.
  2. Contracts

    1. All members of the instructional and administrative staff are offered formal written contracts each year. These contracts outline the title of the position to which the individual is appointed, the salary, and term of the appointment. A sample contract is found here.
    2. Members of the instructional staff who have achieved tenure are offered a contract each year, and it is understood that the contract will be offered automatically, unless the individual retires, resigns, or formal charges are made against the instructor as provided in the regulations covering tenure.
    3. Contracts will be distributed after the Board of Trustees the new budget. It is expected that contracts will be accepted or rejected in writing within ten (10) days of receipt.
    4. The position of faculty members on the new salary schedule will be determined by the President after consultation with the Provost and after the Provost has received recommendations from the deans. Special consideration will be given to faculty members who are continuing their graduate work, those who are doing especially effective teaching in the classroom and who are exerting constructive leadership in other campus roles, and those who are actively engaged in research.
  3. Criteria and Specific Rules for Tenure

    1. Criteria for Evaluation of Applications for Tenure
      1. Evaluation of applications for tenure will be based upon 1) the applicant’s scholarship of teaching; scholarly activity; and service to the University, profession, and community; and 2) satisfactory progress in achieving developmental goals. To be eligible for tenure, a faculty member must have at least a master’s degree and have a tenure-track appointment. Departments may have additional requirements for attaining tenure, which are agreed to at the time of employment.
      2. Evaluation of applications for tenure will not be based upon an arbitrary number of years at the institution; however, an adequate amount of time is necessary for a teacher to demonstrate competence and for the institution to evaluate it. Therefore, the following minimum probationary periods should be followed:
        1. Professor                            — after 2 completed years
        2. Associate Professor        — after 2 completed years
        3. Assistant Professor         — after 3 completed years
        4. Instructor                            — after 4 completed years
      3. Typically, the probationary period is longer than the above stated MINIMUM probationary period. NORMAL PROBATIONARY PERIODS are as follows:
        1. Professor                            — after 3 completed years
        2. Associate Professor        — after 4 completed years
        3. Assistant Professor         — after 5 completed years
        4. Instructor                            — after 5 completed years
      4. Exceptions to the above probationary periods may be made by the President of the University in extraordinary cases.
    2. Notice of Attainment or Denial of Tenure
      1. The faculty member must be given written notice of attainment or denial of tenure at the end of the sixth year. (A one-year approved leave of absence granted by the University counts as one year in the probationary period.) During the probationary period, notice of non-reappointment or of intention not to recommend reappointment to the Board of Trustees will be given in accordance with the following:
        • not later than March 1 of the first year of academic service,
        • not later than December 15 of the second year of academic service, and
        • at least twelve months before expiration of an appointment after two or more years at the University.
    3. Procedures for Appeal of Tenure Decisions
      1. All applications for tenure will be evaluated and forwarded for further review through all levels of the evaluation process, up to and including the Board of Trustees, unless withdrawn by the applicant.
      2. The College Council, dean, University Council, Provost, and President will each notify the applicant by Form I of a positive or negative recommendation. This should be accomplished in not more than five days.  For each candidate who receives a negative recommendation, the notification will state the general reasons for such recommendation, based upon relevant criteria.
      3. Within five (5) working days of receipt of any Form I with a negative recommendation, an applicant may submit a written appeal to the next level, which includes a brief statement (not exceeding two pages) explaining reasons for the appeal. The written appeal will be added to the application package, and a copy of the written appeal will be sent to the department chair for informational purposes. Final appeal is made by letter to the SAU Board of Trustees.
  4. Criteria and Specific Rules for Promotion

    1. Criteria to Determine Eligibility for Promotion
      1. Eligibility for promotion consideration is determined based on academic credentials, years, of professional experience, and time in rank. Academic credentials and years of professional experience are evaluated in terms of the Criteria for Initial Rank Appointment (Part 1.B in this section). The minimum times in rank to be eligible to apply for promotion are as follows:
        1. Associate Professor to Professor — 5 years
        2. Assistant Professor to Associate Professor — 4 years
        3. Instructor to Assistant Professor — 3 years
      2. Exceptions to the above time in rank requirements may be made in cases of extraordinary merit. Exceptions to the above time in rank requirements for promotion from instructor to assistant professor may be made before the three-year minimum when all requirements for a terminal degree except the dissertation are completed.
      3. The above time in rank requirements are minimum criteria necessary to apply for promotion and should not be considered indicative of meriting promotion.
    2. Criteria Evaluated to Determine Merit of Promotion
      1. Satisfaction of the eligibility requirements does not constitute grounds for recommendation. Rather, evaluations will include consideration of all of the following: teaching effectiveness, scholarly activity, and professional service.
        1. Demonstrated effectiveness as a teacher is a necessary criterion and is a primary consideration in all promotion decisions.
        2. Scholarly activity—broadly defined to include published and unpublished research, creative works, and professional academic growth—is a consideration in all promotion decisions.
        3. Service to the University, the profession, and the community is a consideration in all promotion decisions.
    3. Standards for Evaluation of Applications for Promotion
      1. Teaching effectiveness, scholarly activity, and professional service are evaluated as excellent, commendable, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory, based on documentation submitted in the application for promotion. Applicants for promotion should document activities meriting promotion as follows:
        1. For promotion to professor: document excellent performance in either teaching effectiveness or scholarly activity with, at minimum, a commendable evaluation in all categories.
        2. For promotion to associate professor: document commendable teaching effectiveness, scholarly activity, and professional service.
        3. For promotion to assistant professor: document commendable teaching effectiveness with, at minimum, a satisfactory evaluation in all other categories.
    4. Operational Definitions for Evaluating Merit
      1. Promotions from one academic rank to another are based on evaluations of merit. These are subjective evaluations as determined in the eyes of the evaluator relative to the entire faculty.
        1. Teaching effectiveness – Evaluation of teaching effectiveness is based on a combination of accomplishments and contributions, including the following: student evaluations, peer evaluations, courses taught, alumni evaluations, student performance assessments, pedagogical methodologies, summaries of individualized student supervision, and awards and honors received for teaching effectiveness. See the Documentation of Criteria for Promotion and Tenure in Part V of this section.
        2. Scholarly activity – Evaluation of scholarly activity is based on a combination of contributions, including those which are listed in the Documentation of Criteria for Promotion and Tenure. Demonstration of scholarly activity is required in all promotion decisions. Generally speaking, a record of continuous scholarly activity—a commitment to scholarship rather than one-time or intermittent scholarly activity—is important, and the level of scholarly activity is expected to increase as one progresses through the academic ranks. A mixture of scholarly activities is encouraged.
          1. To demonstrate satisfactory scholarly activity, all faculty are expected to perform sufficient scholarly activity to maintain competency in their teaching areas and to ensure that the content in courses they teach is consistent with accepted standards in the field. Typically, satisfactory scholarly activity is demonstrated by a combination of activities, including, for example, expansion of the faculty member’s knowledge base, contribution to curricular development, and attendance at professional meetings.
          2. Commendable scholarly activity is demonstrated by a combination of additional activities, including, for example, scholarly contributions at the state or regional level evidenced by publications, or presentations or by juried presentations in the arts; participation in regional or state professional meetings; and a continual record of attendance at national, regional, and/or state professional meetings.
          3. Excellent scholarly activity is demonstrated by adding a combination of more substantial contributions, including, for example, substantial scholarly contributions at the national and/or regional level evidenced by publication of books and/or articles in refereed professional journals or by juried presentations in the arts; and substantial scholarly presentations at recognized, refereed national and/or regional professional meetings.
        3. Service Evaluation of service is based on a combination of contributions, including those that are listed in the Documentation of Criteria for Promotion and Tenure. Evaluators consider both the quantity and level of service.
    5. Procedures for Appeal of Promotion Decisions
      1. All applications for promotion will continue in the evaluating process at least through Level Four unless withdrawn by the applicant. If an application for promotion receives three successive negative recommendations from the College Council, dean, and University Council, that application will not receive further consideration and will not be forwarded to Level Five, the Provost. All other applications will be forwarded for further review.
      2. The College Council, dean, and University Council will each notify the applicant, using Form I, of the positive or negative recommendation. If the application is reviewed by the Provost and/or the President, they also will notify the applicant of their positive or negative recommendations. For each candidate who receives a negative recommendation, the notification will state the general reasons for such recommendation, based upon relevant criteria.
      3. How a faculty member may appeal: Any faculty member may appeal a negative recommendation for promotion. Within five (5) working days of receipt of any negative recommendation, an applicant may submit a written appeal to the next level, which should include a brief statement (not exceeding two pages) explaining reasons for the appeal. The written appeal will be added to the application package, and a copy of the written appeal will be sent to the department chair. An applicant who receives a negative recommendation from the President may appeal by letter to the SAU Board of Trustees.
  5. Documentation of Criteria for Tenure and Promotion
    1. Applications for tenure and promotion should include documentation of all criteria to be considered. These criteria should include any and all current tenure and promotion standards for the applicant’s department and college. Unless otherwise specified, evidence presented should be for the time period since the last promotion or since the initial appointment if no promotion has been received.
    2. Applications should follow the outline presented below. Concise, well-organized documentation is encouraged. Applications for tenure and promotion may be submitted digitally via a shared drive.
      1. Required General Information
        1. Table of Contents
        2. Current resume
        3. Copy of the most recent Annual Summary of Professional Activity placed in Mentor
        4. Copy of all developmental plans (for non-tenured faculty only)
      2. Documentation of Teaching Effectiveness
        1. Required Documentation
          1. Student Evaluations
            1. Summary of all student evaluations from the past three years.
            2. Identification of evaluations for each course by semester, year, course prefix and number, course section, and course title.
            3. All written student comments for each course, with appropriate identification.
            4. If desired, faculty member’s written responses to the student evaluations and to the written comments.
          2. Peer Evaluations
            1. Summaries of required Peer Evaluation Forms from the past three years.
          3. Courses Taught
            1. Listing of all courses taught during the past three years.
            2. Examples of course syllabi for three courses taught during the past three years.
        2. Optional Documentation
          1. Supplemental Peer Evaluation(s)
            1. Written peer evaluations based upon observation of teaching performance (including online courses), and/or
            2. Written peer evaluations based upon viewing a videotape of teaching.
            3. Descriptions of conditions under which evaluations (a) or (b) were conducted.
          2. Alumni Evaluations
            1. Solicited or unsolicited testimonial letters. (Specify whether solicited or unsolicited.)
            2. Summary of alumni accomplishments, as reported in the last three Annual Summaries of Professional Activity placed in Mentor.
          3. Student Performance Assessments
            1. Summaries of student accomplishments, as reported in the last three Annual Summaries of Professional Activity in Mentorfor example, admissions to graduate and professional schools, performance on standardized examinations, job placement, honors and awards, and course examination results.
          4. Pedagogical Methodologies
            1. Summary of innovative pedagogical methodologies used in teaching, as reported in the last three Annual Summaries of Professional Activity in Mentor.
            2. Summary of help sessions and tutorial work used in supporting instruction.
          5. Individualized Student Supervision
            1. Summaries of student supervision, e.g., undergraduate research, practicums, independent study courses, and direction of theses and honor projects.
          6. Awards and honors received for teaching effectiveness.
          7. Additional documentation that supports teaching effectiveness, such as a teaching portfolio.
      3. Documentation of Research, Creative Works, and Scholarly Activity
        1. Bibliography of publications. Copies of publications should be available upon request.
        2. Solicited and unsolicited reviews of faculty member’s published works by experts in the field.
        3. Summaries of faculty member’s creative shows, recitals, etc.
        4. Critiques of above creative shows, recitals, etc.
        5. Summaries of reviews and critiques made by faculty member of others’ research and creative works.
        6. Descriptions, including programs, of faculty member’s scholarly presentations.
        7. Documentation of significant expansion of faculty member’s knowledge laterally and/or vertically related to faculty member’s discipline, e.g., new undergraduate and graduate credits earned, self-study, seminars and workshops, and additional degrees and certificates.
        8. Documentation of significant curricular development and curricular research by faculty member.
        9. Description of grant proposals submitted by faculty member and funding received.
        10. Summary of attendance at professional meetings, with indication of level of participation.
        11. Summaries of unpublished and in-progress research by faculty member.
      4. Documentation of Service
        1. Institutional Service
          1. Summary of student advising responsibilities, including field(s), number of advisees, and an evaluation of effectiveness of advising.
          2. List of University committees, offices held, work written, and studies completed.
          3. Summary of activities directed toward fundraising.
          4. Summary of activities related to sponsorship of student group(s).
          5. Summary of activities directed to student recruitment.
          6. Description of consultation provided to other departments or areas of the University.
          7. Summary of contributions to self-studies of department, school, or University.
          8. Summary of responsibilities for teaching non-credit courses, workshops, or seminars.
          9. Summary of non-teaching or administrative duties.
        2. Professional Service
          1. List of memberships in professional organizations.
          2. List of offices held in professional organizations.
          3. Summary of participation in professional organizations, including attendance at meetings.
          4. Summary of work on professional organization committees.
          5. Summary of activities related to organization of professional conferences, workshops, or seminars.
          6. List of presentations at professional conferences, workshops, or seminars.
        3. Community Service
          1. List of memberships in community organizations.
          2. List of offices held in community organizations.
          3. Summary of other participation in community service activities.
  6. Application Procedures for Tenure and Promotion
    1. During the fall semester of each year, the administration will notify the faculty regarding tenure and promotion procedures. This information includes the date by which to apply for promotion and/or tenure and the dates on which action will be taken on applications during the decision process.
    2. Faculty members seeking promotion and/or tenure will initiate the process by submitting an application (Form D) and supporting documents to the department chairperson. Deans and department chairpersons may solicit such applications. See Documentation of Criteria for Tenure and Promotion for outline of supporting documentation “See flow chart for Faculty Promotion and Tenure Process.
    3. Faculty members with non-tenure-track appointments may apply for promotion. Such applications are evaluated on the same criteria and follow the same procedures as applications for promotion for faculty members with tenure-track appointments.
    4. Applications for tenure and promotion will be evaluated using the following procedures: All evaluations are based on documentation submitted in the application for promotion and/or tenure. An applicant cannot add documentation to the application after it is submitted to the department chair. Upon receipt of a negative recommendation, the applicant may add a two-page letter of appeal. Procedures for Appeal of Tenure Decisions and Procedures for Appeal of Promotion Decisions. Evaluators may add documentation to the application to clarify and/or verify statements of fact and must notify applicant of such additions.
    5. An applicant may choose to withdraw the application for promotion and/or tenure at any point in the process.
      1. Levels
        1. Level One: Department Chairperson.
          1. The department chairperson will review the departmental applications for promotion and/or tenure and supporting documentation. The chairperson must consult with other members of the department during the review process.
          2. The chairperson will complete and attach to each application
            1. an evaluation and recommendation Form E;
            2. a detailed and specific account of the ways in which the candidate’s
              • teaching effectiveness. Documentation of Teaching Effectiveness;
              • research, creative works, and scholarly activity. Documentation of Research, Creative Works, and Scholarly Activity, above, especially scholarly activity specific to the discipline of the candidate should be presented as described in the college guidelines; and
              • service Documentation of Service
              • do (in the case of a positive recommendation) or do not (in case of a negative recommendation) meet the criteria for promotion, as detailed in Criteria and Specific Rules for Promotion of this section; and
            3. the cover sheet that records the disposition of the application at each step in the decision process Form C.
              • Within three (3) working days following the decision, the chairperson will send a response form Form I to each applicant, indicating that the application has been reviewed and forwarded to Level Two.
              • All applications will be forwarded to the College Tenure and Promotion Council.
        2. Level Two: College Tenure and Promotion Council
          1. Each college will determine a method for selecting a College Tenure and Promotion Council and for selecting a chairperson for the College Council. The College Council will include only tenured faculty members representing the departments of the college and will include no more than one department chair. The College Council must consist of at least three faculty members; the exact size and composition will vary according to the needs of each college. (An applicant for promotion and/or tenure may not serve on the College Council.) If an elected University Council representative is not on the respective College Council, one elected representative will attend all meetings of the College Council.
          2. The College Council will review the applications in its college. Following careful review, the College Council will vote by secret ballot with decisions based on a majority opinion.
          3. The College Council chairperson will complete and attach to each application
            1. an evaluation and recommendation Form F;
            2. teaching effectiveness. Documentation of Teaching Effectiveness, above);
              • research, creative works, and scholarly activity. Documentation of Research, Creative Works, and Scholarly Activity, especially scholarly activity specific to the discipline of the candidate as described in the college guidelines; and
              • Documentation of Service
              • do (in the case of a positive recommendation) or do not (in case of a negative recommendation) meet the criteria for promotion, as detailed in IV. Criteria and Specific Rules for Promotion of this section; and
            3. the cover sheet which records the disposition of the application at each step in the decision process Form C.
          4. The College Council will prepare 1) a list of applicants whom it recommends for promotion and/or tenure and 2) a list of applicants whom it does not recommend. Each list will include a tally of the votes for each applicant.
          5. Within three (3) working days following its decision, the College Council chairperson will send a response form Form I to each applicant indicating a positive or negative recommendation. For each applicant who receives a negative recommendation, the notification will state the general reason for such recommendation.
          6. The College Council will forward all applications to the college dean.
        3. Level Three: College Dean
          1. The dean of each college will review all applications in the college. The dean will attach an evaluation and recommendation to each application.
          2. The dean will complete and attach to each application:
            1. an evaluation and recommendation Form G;
            2. a detailed and specific account of the ways in which the candidate’s
              • teaching effectiveness. Documentation of Teaching Effectiveness;
              • research, creative works, and scholarly activity, Documentation of Research, Creative Works, and Scholarly Activity, especially scholarly activity specific to the discipline of the candidate as described in the college guidelines; and
              • Documentation of Service,
              • do (in the case of a positive recommendation) or do not (in case of a negative recommendation) meet the criteria for promotion, as detailed in IV. Criteria and Specific Rules for Promotion of this section; and
            3. the cover sheet which records the disposition of the application at each step in the decision process, Form C.
          3. The dean will prepare 1) a list of applicants in the college whom the dean recommends for promotion and/or tenure and 2) a list of applicants not recommended.
          4. Within three (3) working days following the dean’s decision, the dean will notify each applicant of the status of the application indicating a positive or negative recommendation Form I. For each applicant who receives a negative recommendation, the notification will state the general reasons for such recommendation. The dean also will invite each applicant to confer with the dean about the evaluation and recommendation.
          5. The dean will forward all applications and both lists to the University Tenure and Promotion Council.
        4. Level Four: University and Tenure Promotion Council
          1. The University Tenure and Promotion Council will be composed of eight tenured faculty members, two from each college. The Provost will serve as non-voting chair of the University Council.
          2. At the first school meeting for the academic year, each college will elect one representative and one alternate to serve a two-year term on the University Tenure and Promotion Council. The representative and alternate should be senior, tenured faculty members. A representative cannot serve on the Council if under consideration for promotion. If an elected member of the council chooses to seek tenure or promotion during his or her term, the College will elect a replacement to finish out the term.
          3. Representatives cannot serve two consecutive terms on the Council. Each college should develop a schedule which allows for rotation among departments within the college.
          4. Faculty members may serve on both the College Council and University Council. If an elected University Council representative is not on the respective College Council, one representative will attend all meetings of the College Council.
          5. The University Council will review and evaluate all applications for promotion and/or tenure.
          6. The University Council will complete and attach to each application
            1. an evaluation and recommendation Form H;
            2. a detailed and specific account of the ways in which the candidate’s
              • teaching effectiveness (see B. Documentation of Teaching Effectiveness, above);
              • research, creative works, and scholarly activity. Documentation of Research, Creative Works, and Scholarly Activity, especially scholarly activity specific to the discipline of the candidate as described in the college guidelines; and
              • Documentation of Service
              • do (in the case of a positive recommendation) or do not (in case of a negative recommendation) meet the criteria for promotion, as detailed in IV. Criteria and Specific Rules for Promotion of this section; and
            3. the cover sheet which records the disposition of the application at each step in the decision process Form C.
          7. The University Council will compile a single list of applicants who are recommended for promotion and/or tenure. All decisions of the University Council will be based on voting by secret ballot. Decisions will be determined based on the majority opinion (5 out of 8).
          8. Within three (3) working days following conclusion of its deliberations, the University Council will notify each applicant of the status of the application Form I and will provide each applicant with a copy of the narrative explanation.
          9. After the deliberations of the University Council, any application for promotion that has received three successive negative recommendations at Levels Two, Three, and Four is removed from consideration. All applications for tenure are forwarded for further review through all levels, regardless of recommendations at any level, unless the faculty member withdraws the application.
          10. The University Tenure and Promotion Council will forward both lists, all applications for promotion which are still under consideration, and applications for tenure to the Provost.
        5. Level Five: Provost
          1. The Provost will review and evaluate applications for promotion and/or tenure. The Provost will complete and attach to each application an evaluation and recommendation Form G and the cover sheet recording disposition of the application Form C.
          2. Within three (3) working days following the decision, the Provost will send a response form Form I to each applicant indicating that the application has been reviewed and forwarded to the President. The Provost will present the applications and his or her recommendations to the President.
        6. Level Six: President
          1. The President will evaluate the Provost’s recommendations for promotion and/or tenure and all other forms and related documentation deemed appropriate. A scanned copy of all application documents will be retained by Office of Human Resources. Each applicant should retain a file copy.
          2. The President will convey his or her recommendations on promotion and tenure to the Provost and the deans of the colleges prior to presentation of the recommendations to the Board of Trustees. Within three (3) working days following conclusion of the President’s deliberations, the President will notify each applicant of his or her recommendation Form I. For each applicant who receives a negative recommendation from the President, the notification will include a written general statement of the reasons for the decision.
          3. The President then will make his or her recommendations on promotion and tenure to the Board of Trustees.
        7. Level Seven: The Board of Trustees
          1. The Board of Trustees will make the final decision on promotion and tenure. Upon approval by the Board of Trustees, and following Level Eight, there will be a public announcement.
        8. Level Eight: Notification of Candidate
          1. Within ten (10) working days of the Board of Trustee’s decision about tenure and/or promotion, the President will write a letter directly to the candidate, informing them of the University’s final decision.
      2. Procedures for Decision on Tenure and Promotion for Department Chairs, Deans and  Administrators
        1. Department chairs seeking promotion and/or tenure submit an application and supporting documents to the chair of the College’s Tenure and Promotion Council for initial review. Evaluation of an application for promotion and/or tenure from a department chair begins at level two, the College Tenure and Promotion Council, and proceeds through the regular remaining evaluation process.  Deans seeking promotion and/or tenure submit an application and supporting documentation to the relevant department chair for initial evaluation. Evaluation of an application for promotion/tenure from a dean begins with the relevant department chair, proceeds through the College Tenure and Promotion Council, and is forwarded from the College Council directly to the chair of the University Council.
        2. An application for tenure from an administrator holding academic rank and a tenure-track appointment is submitted to the relevant department chair for initial evaluation and then proceeds through the regular evaluation process. However, if the applicant is the Provost, the application is forwarded from the University Council directly to the President.
        3. Deans and the Provost who apply for promotion and/or tenure are expected to excuse themselves during the evaluation of their applications.
  7. Termination of Appointment, Dismissal Review, Dismissal Appeals

    1. Termination of Appointment
      1. By the Faculty Member. A faculty member may terminate an appointment effective at the end of an academic year, provided that notice is given in writing at the earliest possible opportunity, but no later than May 15, or 30 days after receiving notification of the terms of the appointment for the coming year, whichever date occurs later. A faculty member may properly request a waiver of this requirement of notice in case of hardship or in a situation involving the potential loss of substantial professional advancement or other opportunity.
      2. By the Institution. Terminations of tenured appointments or of non-tenured special appointments which occur before the end of the appointment period may be made for three reasons: 1) for bona fide financial exigency or discontinuation of a program or department of instruction, 2) for medical reasons, or 3) for just cause.
        1. For 1 and/or 2: Terminations based on bona fide financial exigency or discontinuation of a program or department of instruction or on medical reasons must be documented by clear and convincing evidence. (3) Termination may be made for just cause—including gross negligence, incompetence, and gross unfitness to associate with students or faculty, or moral turpitude. Just cause includes such grounds which are put forth by the Board of Trustees in good faith and which are not arbitrary, irrational, or unreasonable. In the case of termination of a tenured appointment for just cause, the burden of proof rests upon the institution. Adequate cause for dismissal will be related directly and substantially to the fitness of the faculty member in the professional capacity as a teacher.
        2. All dismissal procedures will be preceded by discussions between the faculty member and appropriate administrative officer, attempting mutual agreement. The decision to terminate will be reached only after 1) the faculty member or designated representative has been informed of the basis of the proposed action and 2) the faculty member has been afforded an opportunity to respond to the appropriate administrative officer, presenting his or her position and responding to the evidence.
      3. Termination Schedule. If the appointment is terminated, the faculty member will receive salary in accordance with the following schedule: at least three months, if the final decision is reached by March 1 (or three months prior to the expiration) of the first year of probationary service; at least six months, if the decision is reached by December of the second year (or after nine months but prior to eighteen months) of probationary service or if the faculty member has tenure. This provision for terminal notice or salary need not apply if there has been a finding that the conduct which justified dismissal involved just cause, as defined above. On the recommendation of the faculty hearing committee or the President, the governing board—in determining what, if any, payments will be made beyond the effective date of dismissal—may take into account the length and quality of service of the faculty member.
        1. Before terminating an appointment because of the abandonment of a program or department of instruction, the institution will make every effort to place affected faculty members in other suitable positions. If an appointment is terminated before the end of the period of appointment because of financial exigency or because of the discontinuance of a program of instruction, the released faculty member’s place will not be filled by a replacement within a period of two years, unless the released faculty member has been offered reappointment and a reasonable time within which to accept or decline it.
    2. Dismissal Review Procedures
      1. Termination of tenured appointments or of non-tenured appointments which occur before the end of the appointment period may be appealed based on the following procedures:
      2. Review by Mediation Committee – If the parties cannot reach a mutual agreement, the faculty member may initiate a review by a Mediation Committee by informing the Vice President for Administration and General Counsel of their desire to do so within five (5) working days of receiving the notice of termination. The Mediation Committee will be appointed by the Faculty Senate Committee on Committees and will consist of three members of the Faculty Senate. The Mediation Committee will attempt to resolve the dispute through consultation with the faculty member and the appropriate administrative officer(s). The faculty member may appeal in person or in writing to the Mediation Committee.
        1. Financial Exigency – When termination is based on a bona fide financial exigency or discontinuation of a program or department of instruction, the Mediation Committee will request that the administration provide the faculty member with a written statement explaining 1) the basis for the initial decision and 2) the information and data upon which the decision makers relied.
        2. Medical Reasons – When termination is based on medical reasons, the Mediation Committee will request that the administration provide the faculty member with a written statement explaining 1) the basis for the initial decision and 2) the medical evidence upon which the decision makers relied.
        3. Just Cause – when termination is for just cause, the Mediation Committee will request that the administration provide the faculty member with a written statement explaining the basis for the initial decision, or verify that the administration has already done so.
      3. Faculty member appeal to Faculty Appeals SubcommitteeIf the Mediation Committee cannot resolve the issue to the satisfaction of all parties, the faculty member can initiate an appeal by written request to the chair of the Faculty Appeals subcommittee of the Faculty/Staff Appeals Committee. The faculty member must initiate the appeal within ten (10) working days following conclusion of the review by the Mediation Committee. If the faculty member chooses not to initiate a review by the Mediation Committee, then the ten (10) working day window for filing an appeal with the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee begins with the date that the faculty member receives notice of termination. During summer months, all Fridays will be counted as working days for the purposes of the ten-day time window unless the Friday in question is an official University holiday.
      4. Upon receipt of the appeal request, the chair of the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee will notify the President. Within five (5) working days, the President or a delegate of the President will provide a written statement of the administration’s position to the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee. The statement will offer clear and convincing evidence substantiating the administration’s position. When the termination is based on just cause, the President or a delegate of the President will formulate a statement of charges, framed with reasonable particularity. The statement of charges will be transmitted to the faculty member and to the chairperson of the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee.
    3. Dismissal Appeals Procedures
      1. Within ten (10) working days following receipt of the formal statement by the President, the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee will conduct a formal hearing. Notice of the hearing with specific charges in writing will be dispatched to the faculty member and all other concerned parties at least five working days before the hearing. During summer months, all Fridays will be counted as working days for the purposes of the ten-10 and five- day windows specified in this section, unless the Friday in question is an official University holiday.
      2. The Faculty Appeals Subcommittee will proceed by considering the statement of grounds for dismissal already formulated and the faculty member’s response written before the time of the hearing. Members of the hearing committee deeming themselves disqualified for bias or interest shall remove themselves from the case (to be replaced by alternates agreed upon by the President of the Faculty Senate and President of the University).  Each party shall have a maximum of two challenges without stated cause. The faculty member and the administration shall have the right to confront and cross-examine all witnesses. A letter from the President or the President’s representative shall be addressed to the chairperson of the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee, putting into writing the pertinent facts of the case.
      3. The Faculty Appeals Subcommittee, in consultation with the President and the faculty member, should exercise its judgment as to whether the hearing should be public or private. The parties of both sides will submit in writing the name of an academic advisor and counsel, if desired, and the names of any witnesses to the chairperson of the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee at least one week before any hearing. At the request of either party or the hearing committee, a representative of a responsible educational association shall be permitted to attend the proceedings as an observer. The committee will invite the President of the University or the President’s representative. Each of the following may invite one observer: the faculty member, the President, and the committee. Questioning of witnesses will be limited to members of the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee, the faculty member involved, and the President or the President’s representative. Questioning shall be relayed through the chair to the person to whom the question is directed. The President or the President’s authorized representative will have the option of attendance during the hearing. The President or the President’s representative, as well as the faculty member, may be assisted by counsel.
      4. A verbatim record of the hearing will be made, and a hard copy will be made available to the faculty member without cost if the faculty member so requests. The “burden of proof” that adequate cause exists rests with the institution and shall be satisfied only by clear and convincing evidence in the record considered as a whole. The hearing committee will not be bound by strict rules of legal evidence and may admit any evidence that is of a probative value in determining the issues involved. Every possible effort will be made to obtain the most reliable evidence.
      5. Following the hearing, and as soon as possible, the committee in closed session will draw up a written report, which will include a recommendation with respect to each of the charges which have been presented as being pertinent to the resolution of the problem. A copy of these recommendations will be submitted to the President of the University and to the individual faculty member involved.
      6. Except for simple announcements as may be required covering the time of the hearing and similar matters, public statements and publicity about the case will be avoided so far as possible by the faculty member, the committee, and administrative offices until the proceedings have been completed, including consideration by the Board of Trustees. The President and the faculty member will be notified of the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee’s decision in writing and will be given a copy of the record of the hearing.
      7. If the hearing committee concludes that adequate cause for dismissal has not been established by the evidence in the record, it will so report to the President. If the President rejects the report, the President will present the reasons for the rejection in writing to the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee and to the faculty member and provide an opportunity for response before transmitting the case to the Board of Trustees. If the hearing committee concludes that adequate cause for dismissal has been established but that an academic penalty less than dismissal would be appropriate, it will so recommend by providing supporting reasons.
      8. Consideration by the Board of Trustees
        1. If dismissal or other severe sanction is recommended, the President will, on request of the faculty member, transmit to the Board of Trustees the record of the case. The Board of Trustees’ review will be based on the record of the committee hearing, and the Board will provide opportunity for argument, oral or written or both, by the principals at the hearings or by their representatives.
        2. Either the decision of the hearing committee will be sustained, or the proceedings will be returned to the committee with specific objections. The committee will then consider, taking into account the stated objections and receiving new evidence, if necessary. The Board of Trustees will make a final decision only after study of the committee’s reconsideration.
      9. Procedures for Imposition of Sanction other than Dismissal
        1. If the administration believes that the conduct of a faculty member, although not constituting adequate cause for dismissal, is sufficiently serious to justify imposition of severe sanction, such as suspension, the same procedures as for dismissal shall be followed.
        2. If the administration seeks to impose a minor sanction, such as a reprimand, it shall notify the faculty member of the basis for the sanction and provide the faculty member an opportunity to persuade the administration that the proposed sanction should not be imposed.
        3. If the faculty member believes that a major sanction has been incorrectly imposed or that a minor sanction has been unjustly imposed, the faculty member may petition the Faculty Appeals Subcommittee.
      10. Non-reappointment of Non-tenured Faculty
        1. If a faculty member on probationary or other non-tenured appointment alleges that a non-reappointment decision was based significantly on considerations which violate 1) academic freedom, 2) governing policies on making appointments without prejudice with respect to sex, age, race, religion, or national origin, or 3) in retaliation for exercise of first amendment rights, the allegation will be given preliminary consideration by the Mediation Committee of the Faculty Senate, which shall seek to settle the matter by informal methods. The allegations shall be accompanied by a statement that the faculty member agrees to the presentation, for the consideration of the Mediation Committee, of such reasons and evidence as the institution may allege in support of its decision. If the difficulty is unresolved at this stage, and if the Mediation Committee so recommends, the matter will be heard in the manner set forth in the section on Dismissal Procedures, except that the administration in making the complaint is responsible for stating the grounds upon which the allegations are based, but the burden of proof shall rest upon the faculty member to disprove. If the faculty member succeeds in establishing a prima facie case in the opinion of the issue will be referred to the Faculty Subcommittee of the Faculty Staff Appeals and Human Rights Committee, it is incumbent upon those who made the decision not to reappoint the faculty member to come forward with evidence in support of their decision. If the Faculty Subcommittee Committee agrees with the non-reappointment decision, there is no further appeal.
      11. Non-reappointment or Termination of Administrative Personnel
        1. The foregoing regulations apply to administrative personnel who hold academic rank, but only in their capacity as faculty members. If the administrator claims that the reason for termination or non-reappointment as an administrator constitutes a violation of academic freedom, then the administrator is entitled to procedures set forth for non-tenured faculty.

Search Policy for Faculty and Academic Administrators

  1. Summary of the Document and its Purpose

    1. This Search Policy document provides a means of accomplishing the following:

      1. Ensuring the maximum amount of involvement by all the members of the SAU community.

      2. Standardizing searches for faculty, chairs, deans, and Provost.

      3. Setting deadlines for action.

      4. Codifying standards for establishing search committees.

      5. Establishing a recommendation procedure based on consensus.

      6. Ensuring that searches are conducted expeditiously, openly, and inclusively.

      7. Ensuring that the SAU Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Policy (EEO-AA) is followed.

      8. Searching for faculty and academic administrators that support the mission of the University.

      9. Establishing a dialogue with the unit and the supervisors to determine the needs of the unit and University and how best to accomplish both goals.

  2. Search Process Flow Chart

    1. Initiation of Human Resources Requisition The Human Resources Requisition should be initiated by the appropriate individual (chair, dean, director, vice president, or President) and articulates any specific accreditation issues that must be considered in the filling of the position.

    2. Approval by appropriate individuals (supervisory chain including President). This step includes a budget certification by the chair, dean, Provost, and President that this unit has a need for the position and funds exist in the department budget to fund the position. A budget request must accompany the HR requisition through channels to the President. Student semester credit hour (SSCH) production should be included in this analysis with at least the most current three years of data.

    3. Submission of Human Resources Requisition to Office of Human Resources through the chain of supervisors through the President. A decision on the requisition should be communicated back to the initiating individual within 60 days of the submission.

    4. Advertisement preparation. Office of Human Resources prepares advertisement and submits it to initiating individual for approval (who consults with the unit) and then places it in appropriate publications, websites, and mailing lists as described in the EEO-AA policy.

    5. Creation of search committee. The initiating individual or supervisor makes committee member recommendations to the President, and the President approves or amends the list.

    6. Search policy review. The Office of Human Resources reviews with the search committee the Search Policy for Faculty and Academic Administrators and the EEO-AA policy.

    7. Forwarding of applications. The Office of Human Resources receives and acknowledges applications and forwards them to the search committee.

    8. Review of applications. The search committee reviews the applications and, for all positions, selects no more than three finalists to be initially invited to campus. The search committee makes recommendation to President through the supervisory chain. The President consults with the individuals in the supervisory chain in the hiring decision process.

    9. President takes action on search committee’s recommendation. The action of the President will be communicated to the search committee members and Office of Human Resources.

  3. Academic Search Time Line

    1. Searches for faculty positions should be conducted as early in the academic year as possible, preferably in the fall semester, to ensure an adequate pool of applicants will be available for the search committee to consider. Initiating individuals and their supervisors should generally not begin a search for a new tenure track position if the search cannot be completed by May 15. Generally, any advertisement that does not appear in the appropriate publication(s) by March 15 will prevent a search from being completed by May 15.

    2. When an appointment to a position is made as an interim appointment, the search for a person to fill that position on a permanent basis must begin within one year of the date when the interim appointment was made.

  4. Responsibilities of Initiating Individual – Academic Searches (faculty, chair, dean, Provost, president)

    1. The initiating individual for faculty is the chair of the department; the initiating individual for a chair is the dean of the college; the initiating individual for a dean is the Provost, and the President is the initiating individual for the Provost.

    2. For faculty, chair, dean, and Provost positions.

      1. For chair positions, special circumstances exist because chairs also teach a faculty load (with release time for chair responsibilities). Budget considerations may preclude the addition of another faculty member, so the President, in consultation with the faculty in the unit and other relevant administrators, may conclude that the search must be internal to the department.

      2. For dean and Provost positions, meetings will be held by the initiating individual or designee to gather information from the college or all faculty, in the case of the Provost, for recommendations about the search as well as duties, responsibilities and qualifications of the position.

      3. For faculty the initiating individual offers the opportunity for all members of the department to participate in the process of determining specifics of duties, responsibilities, and qualifications of the desired position; identifying any issues relating to accreditation(s) that may affect the qualifications; and developing a list of appropriate venues for advertisement placement. Recommendations for membership on the search committee should be made in consultation with the dean in the case of faculty searches, and should be shared with all members of the unit.

    3. Based on the recommendations in number two (2) above, the initiating individual prepares a Human Resources Requisition and the draft advertisement in consultation with the department or unit. This may be done by e-mail or other methods of communication as time permits. The Human Resources Requisition should include a recommended rank, the academic specialties sought, the duties of the position, and the deadline by which applications will be accepted or date review will begin. Departmental accreditation guidelines and requirements should be addressed at this time.
    4. When approved by the President, the Human Resources Requisition and the job listing are submitted to the Office of Human Resources. The Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirmative Action Plan provides guidance on the type of search to be conducted (local, regional, national).
    5. Most advertisements go to The Chronicle of Higher Education (The Chronicle). Discipline-specific publications or lists should be used when available. Other options will be explored as described in the EEO-AA Plan.
    6. The initiating individual recommends to the President a search committee of approximately five to seven persons whose membership is determined by the following guidelines:
      1. Every effort should be made by the administration to reflect the makeup of the department, as relates to the number of tenured, tenure-track, and non-tenured faculty in that department.
      2. If the committee lacks minority representation or gender diversity, the initiating individual shall recommend the appointment of additional members to rectify such a situation.
      3. In the case of b, or if an insufficient number of faculty within the department are willing or able to serve, faculty from related disciplines may be added to the committee.
      4. The unit may add one student representative to the committee.
      5. The unit, the President, or the Provost and may add non-academic community members whose perspectives would be valuable to the work of the committee and/or in the best interest of the University Academic Administrators. Special provisions for constitution of search committees for academic positions that have administrative duties (Provost, deans, chairs):
        1. Provost: One faculty member selected from each college and two at-large faculty members, all selected by the above criteria, and including at least one senator; one vice president; one academic dean; and one academic staff reporting to the Provost. The President may add additional members based on the needs of the University.
        2. Academic Dean: At least one faculty member (exclusive of chairs) selected from each department within the college by the above faculty guidelines, one chair from within the college, and one dean. The President may add additional members based on the needs of the University.
        3. Chair: The committee should also include a chair from within the college. The President may add additional members based on the needs of the University.
    7. The chair of the committee will be a member of the department or unit in which the new person will serve, unless no members of a department are willing to serve as chair.
    8. After it is constituted, the search committee should take care to include non-tenured, non-tenure-track, and even adjunct faculty in the search process by making materials of applicants available and by including them in the interview process. In the case of academic administrator positions, application materials and an opportunity for interaction will be made available to those units that will be working with the selected individual.
    9. To ensure the search committee has knowledge of state and federal laws governing employment search activities and knowledge of University policies, goals, and objectives, the members of the committee will be informed about recruitment guidelines and about equal employment opportunity and the affirmative action plan. It is the responsibility of the Office of Human Resources to provide this information. Generally, this will be done within two weeks of the appointment of the committee. This may be done by meeting with the committee or by the distribution of recruitment information packets by hard copy or electronically.
  5. Responsibilities of Faculty Search Committee

    1. The chair of the committee, with the assistance of the Office of Human Resources, makes all application materials (which are public information) available to members of the search committee and to members of the unit not on the search committee. Other interested parties may view the application material by contacting the Office of Human Resources or the chair of the search committee.
    2. Throughout the search process, the search committee seeks input from the unit and other interested parties. The chair should use available means (meetings, email communication, etc.) to keep the SAU community informed and provide opportunities for the community to comment on the process and the applicants.
    3. The search committee diligently seeks to discover reliable information about the candidates who may make the finalist list. These include, but are not limited to, the following:
      1. Contact by telephone, mail, and or e-mail with references provided by the candidate.
      2. Contact by telephone, mail, and/or e-mail with other persons who might have valid and reliable knowledge of and insight into the candidate’s qualifications for the job Student members do not make reference calls.
      3. Individual contact with candidates by members of the search committee under the auspices of the search committee and the individual contacting. The search committee member will keep written documentation of the conversation and report back to the search committee.
    4. Using information gained through these activities and from others, the search committee selects applicants of interest. Conference call or video interviews and additional contact with references may occur if needed to gain additional information about the candidates. Conference calls also allow candidates to learn more about the position and the University. In order to conduct a conference call, a majority of the committee must participate.
    5. The search committee selects no more than three finalists to visit the campus. Exceptions for good cause must be approved by the Office of Human Resources and Provost. Search committees allowed to invite candidates to campus may assume that the search will not be cancelled; that is, all other factors remaining constant, they will be allowed to hire a viable candidate out of that pool. In addition, it may be advisable to ascertain if the candidate considers the proposed salary range to be adequate before inviting the candidate to campus. While the search committee should also be made aware of the salary range, such a conversation with the candidate should only be initiated by the dean.
    6. During the campus visit, the search committee schedules time for members of the department or unit and other appropriate individuals to meet with the applicant in formal and informal settings. The committee may invite interested parties to participate in interview activities. Possible activities include
      1. teaching a class,
      2. leading in informal activity,
      3. making a formal presentation,
      4. lunch and/or other opportunities for informal social contact, and
      5. tours of the campus and the community.
    7. In faculty searches, the search committee schedules sessions with the President, the Provost, the Office of Human Resources, the dean of the college, and the chair and faculty in the department. Before the day of the campus visit, an itinerary for the candidate’s visit should be shared with the applicant, search committee, department, and any administrator included in the interview process.
    8. Following campus interviews, the search committee actively solicits input from other members of the department or unit and from others who have examined the candidate’s credentials or come into contact with the candidate during the campus visit. The search committee will send an e-mail to interested individuals requesting comments on the applicants.
    9. The search committee gathers and considers all the information, input, and insights from the individuals participating in the campus visit.
    10. The search committee recommendation process is as follows:
      1. The search committee determines its choice for the position by consensus within seven days after completion of the last interview. In the case of a search for the Provost or a dean, the President may request a ranked list of two or three acceptable candidates. However, in such a case, if the committee cannot recommend more than one acceptable candidate, the committee may recommend that the search be re-initiated.
      2. The committee prepares a brief written statement of the reasons for its recommendation.
      3. If consensus is not reached, members of the search committee who do not agree with the majority recommendation of the committee may document the reasons for their disagreement by providing a written minority report directly to the President, who preserves the confidentiality of the information.
      4. The committee’s recommendation is sent through channels to the President. Each supervisor in the channel makes a recommendation on the selection by the search committee.
      5. If the President rejects the recommended candidate, the President provides written notification promptly to the search committee.
      6. In the case of f, the committee returns to the pool of candidates, identifies by consensus its next choice, prepares a brief statement of its reasons for selecting that person, and sends that information through channels to the President.
      7. The process continues until a candidate who is satisfactory to all parties has been settled upon, or until the search is cancelled.
      8. Before a contract is sent, a background check must be conducted.
    11. Note: The search committee is not to give any assurances or make any offers of employment to any candidate. Only the President approves the selection, and the President sends an offer of employment to the candidate or designates an individual to make the contact (Provost, dean, or chair). The candidate is officially hired once the Provost receives a signed contract from the candidate accepting the position. The search committee is not to dismiss any finalists from consideration, either verbally or in writing, until a candidate is officially hired.
    12. EXCEPTION: The search committee chair will personally and individually inform internal candidates of their status before the identity of candidates to be invited to campus is made public.
    13. If the search committee recommends the hiring of a non-citizen and the President approves, the Office of Human Resources must review immigration guidelines before the President makes the offer to the candidate.
    14. The work of the search committee is not complete until a signed contract is received from the applicant. If an applicant declines an offer and there are no other finalists acceptable to the search committee, the committee will make a recommendation to reopen the search or to cancel the search and fill the position with adjuncts or a one-year appointment.
  6. Post Script

    1. Questions regarding the Faculty Handbook may be addressed to the Faculty Senate Handbook Committee or the vice president for administration and general counsel.
    2. Organizational chart on the website
    3. Academic organizational chart Not one but https://web.saumag.edu/administration/academic-affairs/departments/
    4. Request for class absence  cannot find one on the website see form below
    5. Timeline see below

Appendixes

Appendix C: Faculty Request for Approval of Class Absence

Appendix E: Student Survey Form

Appendix F: Administrator Rating Form

Appendix G: Example Faculty Contract

Appendix H: Student Complaint Policy

Purpose: The following administrative policy and procedures are established to provide an appropriate framework and method to resolve and track student complaints, as designated by the HLC Policy Number FDCR.A.10.030: “An institution shall make available an account of the student complaints it has received, its processing of those complaints, and how that processing comports with the institution’s policies and procedures on the handling of grievances or complaints.” This policy is specifically designed to maintain the integrity of the academic environment and to ensure that the rights of students in such matters are clearly ensured and protected. This policy does not replace or override policies already set forth in the catalog, such as the grade appeal policy. Southern Arkansas University designates the director/chair of the department that received the complaint as responsible for receiving, investigating, and potentially resolving student complaints. From there, the office of the Dean of Students is responsible for intervening if no action is taken, and maintaining the records of complaints and resolutions. No retaliation of any kind shall be taken against a student who articulates a complaint. Scope: The policy applies to all Southern Arkansas University students regardless of school, college, status, classification, type, or location. Definitions: Student: Defined as any person enrolled at the university in a course offered for credit. Complainant: Defined as a student who lodges a formal complaint against the respondent.

Respondent: Defined as that person or persons named by the student in a written complaint.

Formal Complaint: Defined as any nontrivial, documented complaint, either academic or nonacademic.

Informal Complaint: Defined as an informal method of communicating a concern to the school, not officially documented and without guaranteed follow-up.

Complaint Procedure: Defined as the process by which a formal complaint is resolved.

Business Days: Refers to weekdays during periods in which classes are conducted, excluding examination week.

Procedure:

  1. All parties are encouraged to first attempt to resolve complaints informally, by speaking directly with the respondent.
  2. If the informal resolution is unsatisfactory, the student may make a formal complaint by submitting the complaint via the web form.
    1. The written complaint submitted by the student should include the nature of the complaint, the facts and circumstances leading to it, supporting documents, and a proposed remedy. The complaint should include any evidence and or documentation pertinent to the issues identified. The written complaint should also note attempts, if any, that were made at informal resolution. This written statement and documentation becomes the basis for all further consideration of the matter. Verbal complaints will not be considered formal complaints.
    2. If the complaint falls under the jurisdiction of a more appropriate procedure, such as Title IX or the grade appeal policy, the student will be referred to the already-established procedure.
    3. The Dean of Students and the head of the department of the respondent will be notified that the complaint has been filed. This notification will contain the names of the complainant, the respondent, and the general nature of the complaint.
    4. The incident will be examined and evaluated fully by the director/chair of the department that received the complaint, including any supporting documentation submitted by the complainant or respondent. The director/chair will provide a copy of the complaint to the respondent within five business days of receipt. The director/chair will then provide a written summary of the findings and recommendations via a second, faculty-only web form within 10 business days of the receipt of the complaint. If the complaint is filed against a director/chair, then the appropriate supervisor will assume these responsibilities. If the complaint is filed against a dean or VP, the final decision will rest with the president of the university.
    5. The director/chair will provide a written decision to the student, the respondent, the Dean of Students, and the appropriate vice president within 10 business days of receipt from the respondent.
    6. The Dean of Students will advise the parties of their right to appeal. Appeals will be considered only if the appellant believes there was a procedural error or other substantive issue. Appeals must be submitted in writing within five business days of receipt of the decision and will be received by Dean of Students. The Dean of Students will forward the appeal to the appropriate vice president. The decision of the vice president will be final.
  3. All parties must follow the time limits stated. If conditions or causes exist requiring a modification of the time limits the Dean of Students shall make the necessary and appropriate adjustments. All parties involved shall be informed immediately of these changes.
  4. Records of any complaint, including those appealed to the Dean of Students, shall be maintained for a minimum of seven years in the Dean of Students’ office.

Appendix H: Student Evaluation Procedures

Faculty members or their immediate supervisors may request and be granted a student evaluation during any semester. The Student Survey Form (see Appendix I) will be used as the instrument for faculty evaluations.

All student evaluations shall be conducted during the last three (3) weeks of class. The Office of Human Resources will send out a list to each of the chairs with all of their classes. The chairs will select which classes they prefer to be evaluated by putting a Y or N in the box before the faculty’s name. All classes may be evaluated. If chairs are unable to respond with this selection then all classes in the department will be selected.

When evaluations become available an email will be sent out from the Office of Human Resources with detailed instruction.

The Office of Human Resources will prepare a summary of evaluations through the SNAP software. When the information is processed, HR will send the results out to the individual faculty and the chair of the department. At no time will student workers be involved in the summary process.